Eating Well and Getting Fit


Reblogged:from merckengage.com                                                                                                                                                                                                             If you’re struggling to find a healthy eating plan that works for you.Or your looking for an exercise plan that you can devote yourself to. This website can help you do just that. They will help you put together an eating plan that fits you’r needs based on things you like.Think about it, if you don’t like the foods in your plan chances are your not going to stick with it very long.So it’s very Important that you think carefully when putting together you’re personal eating plan.Choosing differant food combinations that you will want to eat, and even enjoy. They can also help you with an exercise program based on the activities you like. Exercise is just as Important by that I mean you have to enjoy it or you’re not going to want to do it. There are lots of ways to get exercise so think about different activities you like to do when putting together your exercise program.MerckEngage has a lot of great resources For more Info visit http://www.merckengage.com

                                                                             Eating Well

Your personal Meal Planning tool is waiting. Get great-tasting recipe ideas for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks—all based on your preferences.

The Meal Planning tool can help you create a customized healthy eating plan based on your health goals, the types of foods you like, and any dietary requirements you may have.

                                                                      Getting Fit

Physical activity may be one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself at any age, and having an activity plan is an important step in becoming more active.

In this Getting Fit section you’ll find plenty of information and motivation. You also can create an activity plan and find lots of activities to try.

The Activity Planning tool will help you create a customized plan based on your goals, the types of activities you like, and the time you have to be active each week.

Fabio’s Pasta and Bean Soup


Reblogged:from Shine                                                                                                                                         Fabio’s Pasta and Bean Soup                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Nothing is better for families on a budget than the classic Pasta E Fagioli, Fabio’s super simple and delicious one pot soup with pasta and beans. It’s so flavorful, you’ll forget that it’s VEGETARIAN!

Tips:

  • Beans 101- High in protein and virtually fat-free, these delicious pods are versatile and packed with nutrients. The secret to cooking dry beans without soaking them overnight? Choose smaller beans.
  • Find the Perfect Pasta for Your soups, Soup is a great place to use up spare pasta: break up large noodles, or just add small shapes. Don’t add it until the last few minutes of cooking, and keep pasta on the side when storing soup for later use.
  • Cast-Iron CookwareThe Perfect Soup Pot. Cast-iron is able to maintain and withstand very high temperatures, so pots and pans are able to go from stove top to oven with no hassle. Their heavy weight distributes heat evenly, ensuring perfectly cooked dishes.

 

Ingredients:

3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 carrots, diced

1 onion, diced

2 celery stalks with leaves, diced

1 fennel bulb

3 bay leaves, dried

6 sprigs thyme

¾ lb. Borlotti beans

pinch sea salt

4 garlic cloves – grated

2-3 quarts chicken or vegetable stock

28 oz. can diced tomatoes

pinch sea salt

pinch fresh ground black pepper

extra virgin olive oil for drizzling

2 cups small shaped pasta

20 fresh basil leaves

 

Method:

Heat a large cast-iron pot over medium heat. Add extra virgin olive oil.   Add carrots, onions, and celery and stir. Meanwhile, dice fennel. Add to pot and stir.Strip the thyme sprigs over the pot and discard sticks. Add bay leaf. Sauté about ten minutes, or until the vegetables caramelize and start to soften. Add Borlotti beans and grated garlic; stir.Add stock, canned tomatoes, a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. Stir, cover, and boil for one hour, or until beans are soft. Add pasta and cook for five minutes. If you don’t plan on serving the soup all at once, cook the pasta separately, and add to each bowl as you serve it. Otherwise, the pasta will soak up too much broth when stored. Chop basil and add to pot. Stir thoroughly, and remove from heat. Remove bay leaves and serve immediately

Do These 9 Things in Your Kitchen to Lose Weight


  Reblogged:from Shine                                                                                                                     Do These 9 Things in Your Kitchen to Lose Weight
The kitchen is the heart of the home, but it’s also the place that can make or break you on the weight loss front. If you’re on a quest to slim down, do these nine things in your kitchen.

Make fruits as accessible as a bag of chips: Wash, cut up, and store fruits such as grapes, melon, kiwi, pineapple, and apples in reusable containers in the fridge so they’re easy to grab. Make sure they’re right up front at eye level so they’re the first thing you see when you open the fridge door.

Prepare a big container of salad: Having a salad before dinner is a great way to fill you up so you eat less of the main course, but preparing a salad every night takes so much time that it’s tempting to skip out. Ensure you get a bowl of greens every night by making an enormous bowl of salad at the beginning of the week. You’re sure to eat a salad with dinner if it’s already made – just scoop out a bowl, top with vinaigrette, and enjoy.

Have measuring cups and spoons on the counter: Measuring your food will keep portions in check since overestimating serving sizes is a huge reason people don’t lose weight. Seeing measuring spoons and cups on your kitchen counter will be a visual reminder not to forget to use them.

More from FitSugar: The 6 Foods Every Runner Needs to Eat

Pre-make snack packs: You know what happens when you eat chips or crackers out of the box – you practically end up polishing off the entire package! Take your favorite healthy snacks such as mixed nuts, popcorn, cheese, and fresh fruit, grab some Ziploc baggies, and make some 100-calorie or 150-calorie snack packs you can keep in your cupboard or fridge.

Ditch the unhealthy foods: Your hubby and kids might be fans of an occasional can of soda, bowl of cookie dough ice cream, or Hershey’s Kiss, but if those foods are within your reach, you’re bound to crave them. Throw out or give away the junk because if it’s not in your kitchen, you can’t be tempted to eat it.

Use smaller-sized plates: When we prepare a plate of food, we feel the need to fill it up completely. If you start out with a smaller-sized salad plate, there’s only so much you can pile on, so you’ll end up consuming fewer calories.

More from FitSugar: 4 Monday Metabolism Boosters

Freeze fruits and veggies: Buy larger bags of fruits and veggies at the store and wash, cut, and store them in baggies in the freezer. You’ll not only save money when you buy in bulk, but you’ll also have them on hand to add to your smoothies, yogurt, pasta dishes, soups, and omelets.

Double or even triple the recipe: Whether you’re making soup, roasted veggies, quinoa salad, or something else for dinner, don’t just make enough for one meal. Package the leftovers in containers you can easily grab for the next few days’ meals. If your lunch or dinner is already prepared, you won’t have to resort to unhealthy takeout.

Put food away before you sit down to eat: After you’ve cooked up an amazing vegan mac and cheese, serve yourself an appropriate serving size and then wrap it up and put it in the fridge. If you leave it out, you’re more likely to go back for unnecessary seconds or thirds. Out of sight means off your hips.

It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss


Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                                               It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss                                                                                                                                                                                                                   The heat waves streaking across the country bring up questions in people’s minds about whether they should change their eating and drinking habits in such conditions.

Do our calorie needs change, or does our metabolism increase during the hot summer temps? Well, maybe yes, but probably no. Our bodies are well-tuned to keep things at status quo. If anything, our metabolism may go up when we’re cold, as our bodies need to work harder to maintain our temperature (by shivering). In the heat, our bodies actually slow down a bit to try to conserve energy so as not to overheat. But none of this really makes any significant change in our BMR or how many calories our body needs.

What is important to note is that in hot weather your body is prone to dehydration, and this actually can have an effect on your metabolism. In the course of an average day, sweating, breathing, and waste elimination together leach more than 10 cups of water out of your body — and that’s without exercise. If you don’t replace what you’ve lost, you may become dehydrated; your system literally begins to dry out.

Some people say that their appetite decreases when it’s hot outside. If that’s the case, you should still try to eat small, frequent healthy meals throughout the day. Many people find cool gazpacho refreshing in hotter weather. Try my easy recipe for Icy Gazpacho With Fresh Lime.

The takeaway here: When it’s hot outside, drink plenty of water, and don’t skip your workout! When it’s super hot outside, try not to exercise during the hottest part of the day, especially if you’re exercising outdoors. Early morning and evenings are your best bet. To make sure your body doesn’t overheat, monitor your heart rate. Some people invest in a simple heart rate monitor. It’s also important to don the appropriate workout attire. Don’t wear sweats or heavy clothes while working out when it’s hot. Sweating more doesn’t help you burn more calories; it just may dehydrate you more. And most important, as I mentioned, stay hydrated!

We’re mostly made of water — on average, it comprises around 60 percent of the human body. Specific components of our bodies are even more watery: muscle tissue is 75 percent water, while blood is 70 percent water. Water aids in the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat, and it helps eliminate waste from the body.

Dehydration lowers your body’s energy levels. Because blood is mostly water, when you’re dehydrated the volume of your blood diminishes, lowering amounts of oxygen and nutrients that reach your tissues. Recent studies show there’s a trickle-down effect on metabolism: Dehydration can slow your system to such an extent that you burn fewer calories than you would otherwise during the course of the day. And dehydration can cause other undesirable symptoms, including headache, dizziness, muscle weakness, and a dry, sticky mouth.

If those negative side effects aren’t enough to send you to the faucet to fill a glass, consider that drinking ample water can help maintain a healthy weight. The volume of a glass of water in your belly can make you feel full, and water dilutes sodium levels in your body, combating fluid retention. And if you try drinking a glass of water whenever you feel the urge to snack, you may discover the cause was thirst, not hunger — thereby staving off nibbling.

To stay well-hydrated, follow these guidelines:

  • Aim for eight to 12 glasses a day. Keep a large glass on your desk to track your daily intake. When I’m working at home, I fill a half-gallon pitcher of water each morning to drink throughout my workday. Some days I drink more!
  • Hydrate more when working out. Consume six to eight ounces of water every 20 minutes when exercising, and then have two eight-ounce glasses afterwards to restore fluids. If you plan to exercise for more than an hour, plan for it in advance — up water intake before you work out, hydrate well during exercise, and then chug plenty of fluids after the event.
  • Avoid drinking your calories. Sodas and fruit juices may quench your thirst, but they’re loaded with sugar. Similarly, sports drinks can pack a calorie punch. Unless you exercise for more than an hour, you can replenish your fluids and nutrients using water and healthy post-workout snacks instead.
  • Watch out for drinks that dehydrate. Sound like an oxymoron? Caffeinated soda, tea, coffee and alcohol all have a diuretic effect, causing fluid loss. If you drink coffee or a cocktail, follow-up with an extra water chaser to stay in balance.

If you have a tough time downing enough water, try these strategies:

  • If you dislike the lack of flavor, add herbs like mint or basil, or slices of citrus fruits or cucumber to a pitcher of water. Your next glass will be infused with refreshing taste.
  • Try tea — hot or iced. It’s calorie-free and flavorful. Green tea is another option; its caffeine is surrounded by tannic acid compounds that slow its release into the bloodstream, minimizing its dehydrating effects. Green tea is also a good source of the antioxidant EGCG, which has a mild metabolism-boosting effect. Four cups of green tea per day can kick up your metabolism by 80 calories. Its rich antioxidant reserves are also thought to help combat diseases from Alzheimer’s to cancer.
  • If you routinely turn to other beverages once the day is underway, drink a couple of glasses of water right away when you wake up. You’ll make up for fluids lost overnight and be well on your way to a hydrated day.

The recipe below is for a refreshing drink that’s perfect for spring. Make a jug to keep in your fridge, and you’re guaranteed to quaff healthily all day long!

Zinger Green Tea

Packed with antioxidants, this tea is bursting with flavor, too. Fresh lime juice gives it a tangy zing and a wallop of vitamin C. Makes six servings or 1.5 quarts.

Ingredients

6 cups water 1 cup firmly packed fresh mint leaves 3 green tea bags 1.3 cups agave nectar 1.3 cups fresh lime juice 6 lime slices, for garnish

Instructions:

Bring the water to boil in a three-quart saucepan. Add the mint and tea bags, remove from the heat, and let steep for five minutes. Strain. Stir in the agave and lime juice. Serve hot or iced, garnished with the lime slices.

Mint Factoid: The mint family includes basil, marjoram, oregano, thyme, and rosemary, among others. All are excellent sources of antioxidants. Their leaves have glands containing essential oils, which provide their distinctive flavors.

Nutrient Analysis Per Serving: 43 calories, 0 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 0 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 g monounsaturated fat, 30 mg omega-3, 2 g fiber, 1 g sugar, 13 mg sodium

So how will you take advantage of the summer heat and make it work for you?

‘Extreme Makeover’: Jarvez Hall Loses Nearly Half His Body Weight


Reblogged:from Yahoo News                                                                                                                                                                                                  Extreme  Makeover‘: Jarvez Hall Loses Nearly Half His Body Weight                                                                                                                                                                                                      By the time Jarvez Hall reached his 28th birthday, he was already dangerously obese.

His weight gain had started years before, spurred by a passion for playing football and encouragement from others.

“Middle school is when I started getting big,” Hall of Portland, Ore., said. “People encouraged me to get big. ‘Oh, you’re big, that means you’re more manly. You’re big. You’re strong and tough.’””So I was actually excited,” he said. “I wanted to be big.”

Hall went on to play football at Oregon State University but eventually  his football career and the weight piled on, reaching its peak as his  beloved mother struggled with sickle-cell anemia.

“When my mom got sick, that is when my weight got worse,” he said.

Hall met the love of his life, Adriana, and asked for her hand in marriage. The day before they walked down the aisle together, however, he wrote a letter to Chris Powell, fitness expert and the trainer on                 ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition,” asking for help.

Watch: Man loses more than half his body weight on ‘Extreme Makeover’

When Powell arrived to help, Hall weighed 548 pounds at his first weigh-in.

“Wow, I look at this number and I’m motivated,” he said at the time. “My goal is to get into the “twos” and officially bring sexy back.”

In the next year, with Powell at his side, Hall pushed through the highs and lows of his weight-loss journey.

“I’m just going to keep pushing because I can’t be 548 [pounds],” he said. “The next number after 548 is death.”

After one year on Powell’s program, Hall weighed in at 267 pounds and had dropped from a size 70 waist to a size 38. His total weight loss came to more than 280 pounds.

“My world is so different now because I can appreciate the small things in life,” Hall said today on ”        Good Morning America” alongside Powell. “Just coming here, I got to fly on an airplane and sit in one seat and not have a seat-belt extender. I don’t have to worry about where I’m going to sit. I can sit in a movie theater.”

Powell says it was the same determination that helped Hall succeed as an athlete that pushed him in his weight-loss journey.

“He [Hall] is the epitome of perseverance and persistence,” Powell said. “He fell sometimes like we all do. We’re all human and it happens on the journey but every single time he did he got right back up. He attacked every single day like it was a brand-new day and he kept going and this is where it gets you.”

Also appearing on “GMA” with Hall was his now-wife, Adriana, the woman who sparked his weight-loss journey on the eve of their wedding. Adriana, who lost weight along with her husband, is now expecting the couple’s first child.

“I can go places and live life with my wife and enjoy it,” Hall said of his new life. “It’s amazing.”                                                                                                                                                                                                   Here Is a link to Hall’s Inspiring Video http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/extreme-makeover-jarvez-hall-loses-nearly-half-body-134034289–abc-news-health.html

4 Muscles You Should Never Ignore


  Well I felt that I have been focusing so much on womans health and weight loss for woman so I decided I really need to post something for the men looking for some good fitness tips. So here you go guy’s I found this on Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                              4 Muscles You Should Never Ignore                                                                                                                                                                                                          I’m a fit guy. At least I thought so. That changed earlier this week while doing a video workout called Combat Cardio, which was designed by B.J. Gaddour, one of Men’s Health’s top fitness advisors.

                                                                                                                 Gaddour specializes in metabolic training—that is, fast and intense exercises that not only build muscle, but also boost your metabolism and blast fat. Combat Cardio, part of our all-new Speed Shred workout program (pictured at right), is no exception. In the video, Gaddour tirelessly demonstrates a mix of boxing and karate moves for 40 minutes straight. Even 35 minutes in, he looks ready to take down a gang of thieves.

I, on the other hand, looked like I was trying unsuccessfully to ward off a swarm of gnats. Not only did I get progressively weaker throughout the workout—my jabs to the face became more like pokes to the chest—but by the end I could no longer lift my arms over my shoulders or my feet above knee level.

“I’m out of shape,” I told Men’s Health fitness director Adam Campbell, C.S.C.S., the next day.

“No you’re not,” he said. “You’ve just been ignoring your small muscles.”

I’d fallen into a common trap, explained Campbell. Abs and biceps receive all the glory, so we work them hard. But it’s the little-known muscles—those deep in your core, hips, and shoulders—that make the big ones stand out. Target those areas, and your whole body benefits. Not only will you look better, but you’ll also have more strength and suffer fewer injuries.

The four muscles below may never earn top billing, but building them will rejuvenate your workouts and ignite new growth. Use the exercises below to target them.

Muscle #1: Serratus Anterior

This muscle, located on the side of your chest along your ribs, attaches to and allows you to rotate your shoulder-blade (a.k.a. scapula). It plays a vital role when you raise your shoulder to flex your arm and move it away from your body; that’s why it’s prominent in boxers but not your average guy. Blame the bench press. Because of the support provided by the bench, the serratus anterior doesn’t receive much direct challenge during this popular exercise, says Mike Robertson, C.S.C.S., a strength coach in Indianapolis.

                                                                                                                                Test yours: Do a push up without wearing a shirt and have someone look at your back during the move.    If you have a winged scapula, your shoulder-blade will stick out; this means your serratus is weak, says Robertson. A strong one suction your scapula in during the movement, eliminating the winged look.

Build yours: Standard push ups strengthen the muscle, but doing push up variations is the quickest way to correct a weakness, says Robertson. Use a power rack to perform incline push ups on a bar bell. (Or just use a table or chair at home.) Start with your body at the lowest incline that doesn’t allow your shoulders to wing—which means placing the bar relatively high. Perform 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions. As you become stronger and learn to control your scapula motion, work your way down the rack until you’re doing regular push ups with perfect body alignment.

Muscle #2: Psoas

The psoas (so-az) muscle runs through your hips to connect the lower portion of your back to the top of your thigh. It’s one of your body’s main back stabilizers and hip flexors (the muscles that line your hips and allow you to bring your knees toward your chest). If you sit all day, the psoas becomes rounded like a banana; then, when you stand up, the psoas pulls on your back, making you more prone to pain and lower-back injury. “A weak psoas also means you’ll end up with assorted knee issues, because other secondary hip flexors take over and cause pain,” Robertson says.

                                                                                                                          Test yours: Lie on your back and pull one knee to your chest. Keep your other leg straight. If the psoas is of normal length, your straight leg will rest on the floor. If your leg sits above the floor, your psoas is either stiff or shortened, says Bill Hartman, C.S.C.S., a strength coach based in Indianapolis.

Build yours: The only way to strengthen a weak psoas is by bringing your knee above 90 degrees. Sit with your knees bent on a low box or bench (6 to 10 inches high). Maintaining good posture and keeping your abs tight, use your hips to raise one bent knee slightly higher than your hips. If you lean forward or backward, you’re not performing the exercise correctly. Hold for 5 seconds, and return to the starting position. Complete 3 sets of 5 repetitions per leg. To help release some of the pressure you may feel, you can use your thumb to press on your hip flexor; it’ll be on your side and a little lower than your belly button.

Muscles #3 and #4: Supraspinatus and Subscapularis

The supraspinatus is one of the small muscles at the top of your shoulder that makes up the rotator cuff; the subscapularis is a large muscle on the front of your shoulder-blade. Blame your desk job for weak shoulders: If your upper body is rounded, it’s most likely because your chest is tight, which means the opposing muscles in your shoulders are weak. Strengthen the stabilizing muscles, and you’ll see improvement on your bench press and in overhead sports like swimming or tennis, as well as in your overall upper-body power.

Test yours: Bring your arms straight out in front of you at about a 45-degree angle, your thumbs pointed up—like you’re about to hug someone. Have a friend stand in front of you and push your arms downward with moderate pressure. (The friend’s hands should be positioned above your wrists on your forearms.) If you feel soreness in your shoulders or can’t resist the pressure, you probably need to strengthen your supraspinatus, says Jeff Plasschaert, a strength coach based in Florida.

Build yours: A simple move is all you need, says Robertson. Stand holding a light pair of dumbbells in front of your thighs, palms facing each other. Keeping your thumbs pointed up, raise your arms up at a 30-degree angle to your torso until just above shoulder height. Hold for 1 second, and lower to the starting position. Do 2 sets of 8 to 10 repetitions. The exercise will help you add pounds to your bench by improving the stability of your shoulders.

                                                                                                                                If targeting each of these muscles seems like a hassle, there is an easier way: Do a whole-body routine like Men’s Health’s all-new 82-Day Speed Shred program, which was designed by Gaddour (that’s him at right celebrating the end of one of the workouts). The 8-DVD, 18-workout program, which includes Combat Cardio, eliminates all the guesswork. How so? Every workout hits every muscle in your body.

And for more high-intensity workouts that blast fat, supercharge your metabolism, and ignite every muscle in your body, check out Men’s Health DeltaFIT, the one-stop destination for everything you need to know about metabolic training.

How can I keep track of how much I am eating?


 Rebogged:from Weight-Control Information Network                                                                                                                                                                                        How can I keep track of how much I am eating?                                                                                                To control your weight, you need to do more than just choose a healthy mix of foods. You should also look at the kinds of food you eat and how much you eat at a time

A food diary can be a good way to keep track of how much you are eating. Write down when, what, how much, where, and why you eat. This action can help you be aware of how much you are eating and the times you tend to eat too much. You can keep a food diary in a notebook, on your cell phone, or on a computer.

Figure 2 shows what 1 day of a person’s food diary might look like. As shown in the diary, this person chose relatively healthy portion sizes for breakfast and lunch. At those meals, she ate to satisfy her hunger. She had a large chocolate bar in the afternoon for an emotional reason. She ate because she was bored, not because she was hungry.

By 8 p.m., this person was very hungry and ate large portions of food that were high in fat and calories. She was at a social event and did not realize she was eating so much. If she had made an early evening snack of fruit and fat-free or low-fat yogurt, she might have been less hungry at 8 p.m. and eaten less. By the end of the day, she had eaten a total of 3,930 calories, which is more than most people need to eat in a day. Repeatedly eating excess calories over time can cause weight gain.

If, like the woman in the food diary, you eat even when you are not hungry, try doing something else instead of eating:

  • Take a break to walk around the block.
  • Read a book or magazine or listen to your favorite music.
  • Try doing something with your hands, like knitting or playing cards or checkers.
  • Try drinking water or herbal tea without sugar or eating a low-fat snack such as an apple if a craving hits you.
  • If you are at work, grab a co-worker on the job and go for a quick walk.
    Figure 2. Example of a Food Diary Thursday
    Time Food Amount Place Hunger/Reason Calories*
    8 a.m. Coffee, black 6 fl. oz. Home Slightly hungry 2
    Banana 1 medium 105
    Low-fat yogurt 1 cup 250
    1 p.m. Turkey and cheese sandwich on whole-wheat bread with mustard, tomato, low-fat cheese, and lettuce 3 oz. turkey, 1 slice low-fat cheddar cheese, 2 slices bread Work Hungry 363
    Potato chips, baked 1 small bag 150
    Water 16 fl. oz.
    3 p.m. Chocolate bar 1 bar (5 oz.) Work Not hungry/ Bored 760
    8 p.m. Fried potato skins with cheese and bacon 4 each Restaurant/       Out with       friends Very hungry 667
    Chicken Caesar salad 2 cups lettuce, 6 oz. chicken, 6 Tbsp. dressing, 3/4 cup croutons 633
    Breadsticks 2 large sticks 226
    Apple pie with vanilla ice cream 1/8 of a 9-inch pie, 1 cup ice cream 638
    Soft drink 12 fl. oz. 136

    Total Calories = 3,930

    *Estimates are based on the USDA’s online tool that measures diet and physical activity (http://www.choosemyplate.gov).

    A blank version of the diary for you to copy and use is on page 9 of this document’s PDF file.

    Through your diary, you can become aware of the times and reasons you eat less healthy foods or more food than your body needs. This can help as you try to make different choices in the future.

     

Hudson’s Baked Tilapia


Hudson’s Baked Tilapia                                                                                                                                                                              Ingredients

4 (4 ounce) fillets tilapia

salt and pepper to taste

1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning, or to taste

1 lemon, thinly sliced

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup sour cream

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease a 9×13 inch baking dish. Season the tilapia fillets with salt, pepper and Cajun seasoning on both sides. Arrange the seasoned fillets in a single layer in the baking dish. Place a layer of lemon slices over the fish fillets. I usually use about 2 slices on each piece so that it covers most of the surface of the fish. Bake uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes in the preheated oven, or until fish flakes easily with a fork. While the fish is baking, mix together the mayonnaise, sour cream, garlic powder, lemon juice and dill in a small bowl. Serve with tilapia

Nutritional Facts (Per Serving)

Servings 4

 

Potato-Horseradish-Crusted Mahi-Mahi                                                                                                                                                                      Ingredients

1 cup precooked shredded potatoes

1 shallot, finely chopped

1 tablespoon prepared horseradish

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 1/4 pounds mahi-mahi, skin removed, cut into 4 portions

4 teaspoons reduced-fat mayonnaise

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 lemon, quartered

Directions

Combine potatoes, shallot, horseradish, mustard, garlic salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Spread each portion of fish with 1 teaspoon mayonnaise, then top with one-fourth of the potato mixture, pressing the mixture onto the fish.

2. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Carefully place the fish in the pan potato-side down and cook until crispy and browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Gently turn the fish over, reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the fish flakes easily with a fork, 4 to 5 minutes more. Serve with lemon wedges.

Nutritional Facts (Per Serving)

205 calories; 6 g fat (1 g sat, 3 g mono); 105 mg cholesterol; 9 g carbohydrate; 27 g protein; 1 g fiber; 311 mg sodium; 623 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus: Selenium (74% daily value), Potassium (18% dv).

Servings 4

Calories: 284

Total Fat: 18.6g

Cholesterol: 62mg

Sodium: 598mg

Total Carbs: 5.7g

Dietary Fiber: 1.5g

Protein: 24.6g

Creole Shrimp and Grits


 Reblogged:from mydailymoments                                                                                                                                                           Creole Shrimp and Grits                                                                                                                                                      You’ll want to kiss these grits. It may take a little time to prepare this country cooking, but it’s well worth the wait… in golden grits. One thing is for sure — it’s a melt-in-your-mouth meal. Go ahead — it’s okay to stir the pot with this southern favorite.                                                                                                                                                                                     Ingredients                                                                                                                                                  4 oz. yellow onion, medium dice 2 oz. olive oil 1 oz. shrimp base Creole spice, to taste Dash cracked black pepper 1/2 tbsp. minced garlic 1 oz. butter Splash lemon juice Splash Worcestershire sauce Splash white wine 2 bay leaves 1 cup water 1 cup heavy cream Slow cooking stone ground grits, cooked 1 lb. large shrimp, peeled, deveined 1/4 lb. bell peppers and onions, Julienne 2 tbsp. butter or olive oil                                                                                                                                Methods/steps                                                                                                                                                                    Caramelize onions in olive oil until golden brown. Add shrimp base, Creole spice, pepper, garlic and butter and sauté over medium to high heat for 3 minutes. Add lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, and white wine; simmer until reduced by half. Add bay leaves and water; boil 5 minutes. Remove from heat; cool 20 minutes. Remove bay leaves and mix in cream thoroughly. In a separate pan, sauté Julienne peppers and onions and shrimp in butter or olive oil for 3 minutes over high heat. Add the sauce and continue cooking until reduced by half. Pour the sauce and shrimp over a heaping portion of grits.                          Bay leaf, Black pepper, Cook, Cooking, Cream, Creole, Eating, Food, Garlic, Health, Human nutrition, Nutrition, Olive oil, Shrimp, Weight, Worcestershire sauce

Wake-up call to parents: Children’s fast food meals to avoid


Hardees Kids Meal

Hardees Kids Meal (Photo credit: nibaq)

Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                Wake-up call to parents: Children’s fast food meals to avoidLet’s face it: we all love fast food kids’ meals. Kids love them for the toys and packaging; parents love them because they’re easy and convenient. Plus, when they include apples and cheese, they have some nutritional value, right?Well, not exactly, according to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. According to PCRM, the meals are loaded with sugar and  sodium, and really offer very little nutritional value. They’ve come out with a list of the 5 worst “healthy” fast food kids’ meals. See if some of your favorites are on the list, but remember, the best  advice…everything in moderation.                                                                                                                                                                                           The Committee says that certain fast  food kids’ meals marketed as “healthy” are anything but. “Frankly,  passing off these meals as ‘healthy’ ought to be a crime at a time when 16.9 million American children and adolescents are obese,”  says  PCRM president Dr. Neal Barnard. “The focus on junk food targeted to  kids is important, given how miserably the fast-food industry has failed to live up to its promise of self-regulation.” Here Is a link to the video http://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/wake-up-call-to-parents-worst-fast-food-kids-meals-that-will-surprise-you.html  How often do you treat your kids to fast food meals?                                                                                                                           Eating, Fast food, Food, Happy Meal, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, International Food Information Council, Kids’ meal, McDonald, Neal D. Barnard, Obesity, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, United States, Weight, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips