13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make


Diet and Nutrition

Diet and Nutrition (Photo credit: fantasyhealthball)

13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make

      Reblogged From:Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Get this: 30% of all New Year’s resolutions are broken before February, according to a poll by the time management firm Franklin Covey. “People tend to fall off the weight-loss wagon so quickly because their goals are unrealistic,” says Toby Amidor, a registered dietitian based in New York City. “When people feel as though they’ve failed, they tend to throw in the towel for good instead of giving their resolution another shot.” Here, four of the nation’s top diet experts reveal common weight loss resolutions that almost always backfire.

“I want to lose 20 pounds”

“Dropping 20 pounds is a great long-term goal, but dieters tend to fall off track when they have such a lofty resolution,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Lose 1 pound per week
“Instead of taking on such a big task, focus on losing one pound a week by setting small diet and exercise goals,” suggests Amidor. “For example, resolve to pick skim dairy over whole and pledge to work out 30 minutes, three times a week. You’ll be surprised how small tweaks can result in major change.”

5 Reasons New Year’s Resolutions Fail

“I’m going to try the ________ diet”

Fill in the blank with any fad diet and you’re doomed for failure. A typical diet-of-the-moment requires cutting out one or more major food groups, like fruits, grains, or meats. That’s simply unhealthy and can also prove overwhelming, says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Eat lean protein and veggies at every meal
A well-balanced and properly portioned eating plan that includes a variety of produce and lean meats (and the occasional sweet treat!) will always be the ticket to long-term weight loss, Amidor says.

“I’m going to stop eating at restaurants”

Nixing a night out with friends for the sake of your diet is no way to live, says Amidor. You’ll only wind up frustrated and will be more likely to fall off the wagon.

Revised resolution: Order smarter at restaurants
“Before dining out, have 10 almonds or an apple so you don’t arrive ravenous, and then start with a small salad,” suggests Amidor. In a 2004 study published in theJournal of the American Diet Association, Penn State researchers found that women who started a lunch with a salad consumed up to 12% fewer calories than those who skipped the first course. “Choose a light appetizer as your entree and have the bread basket removed,” says Amidor.

TIME Magazine’s Top 10 Commonly Broken New Years Resolutions

“I’m going to eat 900 calories a day until I lose the weight”

Sure, severely restricting your calorie intake will spur weight loss, but you’ll gain it all back as soon as you start eating normally again (not to mention that starving yourself is dangerous). “This is often the attitude of yo-yo dieters, who go from a size four to a 12 and back again, seemingly overnight,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Develop a healthy eating plan with an RD
If you’re unsure how to lose weight the healthy way, consider making an appointment with a dietitian. “Many RDs now take insurance, so don’t be afraid to ask if yours is accepted,” says Amidor. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has a registered dietitian referral service that allows you to search a database of practitioners across the nation.

“I’m going on a juice cleanse”

After a holiday binge, a detox may seem like a good idea, “but an all-or-nothing approach to weight loss will ultimately fail,” says Lisa DeFazio,RD, a celebrity nutritionist based in Los Angeles.

Revised resolution: Do a mini-cleanse
Jumpstart your weight loss plan with a two-day, 1,200-calorie juice cleanse instead. “Replace breakfast and lunch with a fresh vegetable juice or a protein shake and eat a balanced dinner of whole grains, vegetables, and a lean protein like chicken or fish,” suggests DeFazio.

“I’m going vegetarian”

Losing weight requires burning more calories than you consume, but eliminating meat from your diet won’t necessarily cut your calorie intake. “Newbie vegetarians sometimes gain weight because they are unaware of the hidden calories in vegetarian go-tos like cheese and pasta,” warns DeFazio.

Revised resolution: Reduce your meat intake
“Lean animal proteins should take up no more than a quarter of your plate at each meal,” says DeFazio. Fill the rest of your dish with whole grains, fruits, and vegetables to fuel weight loss. You could also try swapping some of your meat with vegetarian protein sources.

“I’m going to weigh myself every morning”

“Daily weigh-ins are not an accurate gauge of progress,” says Tanya Zuckerbrot, a registered dietitian based in New York City and founder of the F-Factor Diet. Water retention and hormones can mean as much as a two-pound swing in as little as a day. Plus, if your weight-loss plan involves strength training (and it should!), you may even gain weight from increased muscle weight while still losing fat and inches.

Revised resolution: Measure weight loss in inches, not pounds When you feel your pants getting looser as the weeks go by, you’ll know you’re slimming down, says Zuckerbrot.

“I’m quitting junk food”

“Cutting out indulgences may initially help you lose weight, but over time it will make you feel deprived and ultimately lead to bingeing,” warns Zuckerbrot.

Revised resolution: Follow the 80/20 rule
Many weight loss experts recommend making 80% of the calories you consume healthy, and saving the remaining 20% for what may otherwise be considered diet no-nos.

“I’m going to cut calories by skipping breakfast”

Research shows that foregoing a morning meal will put you on the fast track to weight gain, not loss. In a study published in the European Journal of Neuroscience, for example, participants who skipped breakfast were hungrier and more likely to indulge in fattening foods later in the day.

Revised resolution: Eat a protein-packed breakfast every morning
Eating a filling breakfast lessens the chances of bingeing on junk later in the day, says Zuckerbrot. “Pair lean proteins with high fiber, complex carbs—think a veggie omelet with a slice of whole-wheat toast or Greek yogurt with fruit and a tablespoon of nuts—to keep hunger at bay and ward off craving all day long.”

“I won’t eat after 9 pm”

“There is no rule of thumb on what time to stop eating,” says Zuckerbrot. “The body stores any calories that aren’t used for energy regardless of the time those calories are eaten.”

Revised resolution: Sleep at least 7 hours a night
People who skimp on sleep are more susceptible to weight gain, according to a University of Pennsylvania study published in the journal Sleep. Researchers believe that sleep-deprived people tend to consume more calories daily than those who get a full night’s rest.

“I’m going to get more exercise”

“This resolution isn’t specific enough to be successful,” says Jim White, a personal trainer and registered dietitian in Virginia Beach, Va.

Revised resolution: Commit to a set number of weekly workouts
Fitness newbies should start with one weekly workout that combines cardio and weight training, like a body sculpting class or a session with a trainer. After three weeks, build up to two weekly workouts, and over time aim for five workouts a week. Progressing slowly wards off injury and excessive soreness that may prevent or deter you from sticking to your exercise program.

“I’m going to do yoga four times a week”

While yoga is a valuable part of any fitness routine, it probably won’t help you lose much weight. “A typical hour-long session only burns about 200 calories,” notes White.

Revised resolution: Try a variety of workouts
In addition to yoga, include a variety of heart-pumping workouts like walking, weightlifting, cycling, or Zumba in your fitness program to accelerate weight loss, suggests White.

“I’m going to the gym for two hours every day”

Working out two hours a day is not only boring, but it can also cause injury in newbies who aren’t used to being physically active, warns White.

Revised resolution: Do efficient workouts
Trade in long sweat sessions for high intensity, 30-minute interval workouts—you won’t burn out as quickly and you’ll actually torch more calories than doing long, drawn-out workouts,” says White. Plus, researchers from the University of Western Australia found that interval training helps suppress post-workout appetite, further accelerating weight loss.

New York City official defends “supersize” drink ban


New York City official defends “supersize” drink ban

Reblogged:from Yahoo Health                                                                                                            New York City official defends “supersize” drink ban                                                                                                                       WASHINGTON (Reuters) – New York City’s top health official on Thursday shot back at critics who have blasted the city’s plan to limit the sale of oversized sugary drinks such as soda, calling beverage industry opposition ridiculous. The proposed ban, which caps most sugar-sweetened beverages at 16 ounces and carries a $200 fine for vendors that do not comply, met immediate backlash from beverage companies and others who argue it is government overreach, but was lauded by public health experts. “It’s not saying ‘no’ to people. It’s saying, ‘Are you sure? Do you really want that?'” Thomas Farley, New York City’s health commissioner, said. “It’s sending people a message while giving people the freedom to drink as much as they want.” Speaking at an anti-soda conference in Washington, Farley said that drink makers are following the same play-book as tobacco companies that push back against government action aimed at protecting consumers from harmful products. Coca-Cola Co and McDonald’s Corps along with beverage industry groups have said consumers should be able to make their own drink choices and that sodas are not to blame for the nation’s soaring obesity rates. The industry has launched a wave of ads attacking New York City’s plan, which New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced last week. Sugary drink consumption may just be a part of the U.S. obesity epidemic, but the products are the largest single source of sugar in the diet and have a major impact on health, Farley said. Reducing obesity by just 10 percent in New York City would save about 500 lives a year, he added. “It’s ridiculous to say we shouldn’t try something that’s only going to solve a portion of the problem,” he said at the event, which was sponsored by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a group that has long advocated against junk food. American Beverage Association spokeswoman Karen Hanretty, in a statement, defended the group’s response and said Bloomberg’s proposal “has gone too far with a proposal that will do nothing to reduce the serious problem of obesity in America.” The city’s cup size ban will be submitted June 12 to the New York City Board of Health, which will then vote on it after a three-month comment period. If approved by the board, the ban would take effect early next year. The beverage industry is expected to spend massive amounts of money to fight it. Legal analysts have said drink makers face an uphill battle in the courts if they opt for legal challenges to block the effort. Public health experts have embraced Bloomberg’s plan and see it as an approach that could be applied in communities across the country. Kelly Brownell, director of the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University, said targeting sugar sweetened beverages makes sense because they offer empty calories with no nutritional value. Another city’s mayor, Michael Nutter of Philadelphia, told the conference that he has seen some progress from drink makers selling smaller sizes and low-calorie or no-calorie products, but that so far they are not owning up to their role in the nation’s weight struggle. “The industry needs to at least acknowledge that they are part of the problem,” he said.                                                                                                            American Beverage Association, Bloomberg, Calorie, diet, Dieting, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, McDonald, Michael Bloomberg, Michael Nutter, New York City, Nutrition, Soft drink, Thomas Farley, Top weight-loss, Weight, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

THE HUNGER BLOGS


Thinspiration: Pro-Ana & Pro-Mia Website Photo...I found this very important yet slightly disturbing article on aol news. It’s about, A Secret World Of TeenageThinspirationKate leads a double life. Offscreen, she’s a tall, slender, and soft-spoken 17-year-old from Utah, who describes herself as “super awkward” and yet fantasizes about becoming a famous runway model in New York City. Onscreen, she’s the confident champion of a secretive community of teenage girls who celebrate ghoulish thinness, relish photos of emaciated women, and furtively share tips about how to stave off hunger.Kate, whose last name and Tumblr URL have been withheld to protect her identity, is a guru of “thinspo” (short for “thinspiration”). That odd marriage of clever wordplay and disturbing mindset is typical of this underground network of young, female diarist on Tumblr, the image-laden micro-blogging platform popular with teenagers. This codependent sisterhood of bloggers uses Tumblr for one sole purpose: to lose extreme and unhealthy amounts of weight”Most days I feel like what I’m doing could be way too much,” Kate told the Huffington Post. “I know that if I stay on a very dangerous path, that it could kill me within a year easily, if not sooner. But at the same time, I feel like if I set a goal, I have to reach it. I’m pretty torn about it most days, but I’ve never really felt bad enough that I wanted to stop.”Like most thinspo devotees, Kate broadcasts her starting weight (“SW: 151.2”), current weight (“CW: 127”), and ultimate goal weight (“UGW: 115″) at the top of her Tumblr, along with her height (5’10”). These numbers help Kate, and her 5,000 followers, track her weight loss. According to standards for healthy body mass index, Kate’s ultimate goal weight is more in line with a woman 4’10”, or a full foot shorter.Sixteen-year-old Antonia (last name withheld) also runs a popular, photo-based thinspo blog out of her bedroom. “I like images that show skinny, happy girls,” she writes in an email to the Huffington Post. “They look so confident and we can see their bones through their skin. It’s the most beautiful thing ever. I also like tips about food or how to ignore hunger.”Do the authors of these blogs recognize that their work is dangerous and disturbing? Frequently, yes. Travel far enough down the rabbit hole of Tumblr’s thinspo community — which often overlaps with the platform’s blogs devoted to health and fitness, dubbed “fitblrs” and you’ll find cautionary signs advising those prone to disordered eating to venture no further. Look for the words “trigger warning,” thinspo code indicating that you’ve reached a pro-anorexia blog (aka pro-“ana” in thinspo speak).”It’s a huge issue,” says Claire Mysko, an advisor to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), who has seen a large increase in the number of pro-anorexia and pro-bulimia blogs since Tumblr exploded in popularity last year. “Young people who are prone to disordered eating are generally plagued with insecurity and feeling very isolated, so this world of pro-ana provides a community and a sense of belonging, and validates their experiences. But unfortunately, it does so in a way that promotes incredibly unhealthy and dangerous behavior.”Search for “thinspo” on Tumblr, and you’ll find a landing page (www.tumblr.com/tagged/thinspo) with a seemingly endless stream of tagged posts — fashion photographs, food-diary entries, and quotes on willpower and beauty, driven by the thinspo and “fitspo” blogs of thousands of young women. Every word and image posted declares the user’s allegiance to an underweight ideal of beauty.After launching in 2007, Tumblr has shown incredible growth — last year, the site generated roughly 15 billion page views and attracted 120 million unique visitors each month. What draws teens to Tumblr in the first place — the ease of sharing and finding bloggers with common interests, a parent-free environment (now that Facebook has become family friendly), and the diary-like feel of its blogs — also makes the site conducive to health and weight-loss blogs.And where those blogs are prevalent, it’s likely that pro-ana pages that promote disordered eating will thrive, as well. The Tumblr platform is ideal for giving expression to both inspirational and aspirational content — their intimate and frequently anonymous nature make it comfortable for authors to post highly personal information alongside collages of fashion photographs, in an effort to inspire themselves and other girls who are desperate to shed pounds.Although thinspiration sites have been around nearly as long as the Internet itself — as far back as 2001, Yahoo! removed roughly 115 sites (pro-ana was the label used at that time) citing violations of the company’s terms of service — the depth and scope of Tumblr’s teen thinspo community seems unprecedented. Tumblr-based thinspo blogs are a sort of pro-ana 2.0, forgoing chat rooms and message boards in favor of eerily elegant images, sophisticated design, pop-culture references, private messaging, and street-style sensibility. The blogs are reflections of their creators. For millennial girls — uber-connected, style savvy, image-conscious, and concerned about uncertain economic futures — Tumblr offers an intimate, exclusive, and of-the-moment niche community of peers.The pages are both personal memoirs and public bulletin boards. In one corner, you’ll see a “motivational” quote (“I came into 2012 fat but I’m going to leave it skinny,” which was ‘reblogged,’ or shared, more than 1,500 times), and in another, a photo of Victoria’s Secret model Miranda Kerr strutting down the catwalk. Melancholy song lyrics once reserved for the private corners of dog-eared notebooks (“Come on skinny love, what happened here? Come on skinny love, just last the year,” from Bon Iver’s 2008 indie anthem), share the turmoil of the teenage years with thousands of followers. The poster girl for thinspo bloggers is Cassie, the starry-eyed, anorexic pill-popper of the British teen television drama Skins, whose image pops up all over the thinspo blogosphere. The models most frequently featured are Karlie Kloss and Kate Moss. An iconic black-and-white photograph of Kate in an oversized T-shirt that reads “I Beat Obesity” is a recurring theme, perfectly capturing the ethos of the thinspo community.I think as parents it is are responsibility to spread the word about these Hunger Blogs and do what ever we can to put a stop to this. Once again we need to educate our children on the important of Healthy Eating.as well as the damage they are doing to their bodys.My daughter has a tumblr and i will definitely be checking it more often.A nd if you have teenage daughters you should do the same.They need to know how serious this really is.And remember if they get upset about you checking out their sites,it’s most likely because there is something they don’t want you to see.But we are the parents and it is our responsibility to protect our children even from their self. Original post from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/08/thinspiration-blogs_n_1264459.html

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