What to eat after you workout.

     What to eat after you workout                  Reblogged from : Huffington Post                                                                                 As a sports nutritionist, I consult for pro teams and privately counsel professional and competitive athletes in numerous sports, as well as fitness enthusiasts. Pros and weekend warriors definitely have different nutrition needs, but they do have one thing in common: In order to get the most out of being active, everyone needs to eat properly to help their bodies recover from the wear and tear of exercise.

Here are six rules to follow, and how to prevent overdoing it, which can cancel out the weight-loss benefits of breaking a sweat.

Eat within 30 to 60 minutes after exercise.
If you’ve had a particularly tough workout, try to eat a “recovery” meal as soon as possible. Exercise puts stress on your muscles, joints, and bones, and your body “uses up” nutrients during workouts; so post-exercise foods are all about putting back what you’ve lost, and providing the raw materials needed for repair and healing. In fact, it’s the recovery from exercise that really allows you to see results in terms of building strength, endurance, and lean muscle tissue. Not recovering properly can leave you weaker as you go into your next workout, and up your injury risk.

Think beyond protein.
Protein is a building block of muscle, so it is important post exercise, but an ideal recovery meal should also include good fat (also needed for healing muscles and joints), as well as plenty of nutrient-rich produce, and a healthy source of starch such as quinoa, sweet potato, or beans. These foods replenish nutrients that have been depleted, and provide energy to fuel your post-exercise metabolism. A great post-workout meal might be something like a smoothie made with either pea protein powder or grass-fed organic whey protein, whipped with fruit, leafy greens, almond butter or coconut oil, and oats or quinoa, or an omelet made with one whole organic egg and three whites, paired with veggies, avocado and black beans.

Keep it real.
The phrase “you are what you eat” couldn’t be more true. Nutrients from the foods you eat food are the foundation of the structure, function, and integrity of every one of your cells. Your body is continuously repairing, healing, and rebuilding itself, and how healthy your new cells are is directly determined by how well you’ve been eating. In short, your body is essentially one big miraculous construction site that’s open 24/7. So even if you’re lean and you burn a lot of calories, avoiding highly processed food and eating a clean, nutrient rich, whole foods diet can help you get the most out of all of your hard work, including cells that function better, and are less susceptible to premature aging, injury and disease.

Don’t overcompensate.
If weight loss is one of your goals, it’s important to not overestimate how much extra food you “earned” working out. In fact, it’s incredibly easy to “eat back” all of what you’ve burned. For example, in a one-hour elliptical session, an average woman burns about 490 calories. A large salted caramel Pinkberry contains 444 calories, and a 32 ounce high-protein pineapple smoothie from Smoothie King clocks in at 500 calories. Even if you don’t splurge on treats like these, you may be tempted to sneak a little extra almond butter, or be less mindful of your oatmeal or fruit portions, and those extras can add up. And if you’re going to be eating a meal within an hour of finishing up a workout, you don’t also need a post-exercise bar or snack.

If you sweat heavily, exercise in high humidity (which prevents cooling of the body) or your workouts last longer than 60 minutes, you might need a sports drink rather than plain water during exercise. These beverages are designed to keep you well hydrated, but they also provide electrolytes to replace those lost in your sweat (like sodium, which makes sweat salty; and potassium, which helps regulate heart rhythm), as well as fuel to keep you going. If your workouts are less strenuous, shorter, climate controlled, or not so sweaty, plain H2O is probably fine. The general rule of thumb is to drink at least two cups of fluid two hours before exercise, another two cups 15 minutes prior, and a half-cup every 15 minutes during. Post exercise, aim for two cups of water (16 ounces) for every pound of body weight lost, and monitor the color of your urine — if you’re well hydrated it should be pale.

Watch your alcohol intake.
Many athletes and active people I work with enjoy imbibing a bit after working out. Alcohol in moderation is fine, but be sure to eat first to start the recovery process. Also, it’s important to know that alcohol has been shown to accelerate post-exercise muscle loss and the loss of muscle strength by as much as 40%. It can also interfere with replenishing glycogen, the storage form of carbohydrates you stock away in your muscles to serve as energy “piggy banks.” Less glycogen can translate into a lack of power or endurance during your next workout, so aim for moderation

More from Health.com:

Best Superfoods for Weight Loss
11 Ways to Stop Overeating After Your Workouts
30 Healthy Foods That Could Wreck Your Diet

6 Rules For Post-Workout Meals 


Can Vegetarians Go Paleo?

Can Vegetarians Go Paleo?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Reblogged: from Huffington Post                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Bacon, steak and more bacon is often associated with the much-hypedPaleo Diet, which is undoubtedly having a moment. Can vegetarians take part in a diet that puts so much emphasis on meat?

It is possible. Our Paleolithic ancestors were very much about meat, yes, but vegetables, nuts and seeds were also part of their whatever-we-can-get-our-hands-on meal plan. The basic premise of this stone-age eating is to eat like hunter-gatherers did 10,000 years ago. They didn’t have farms, which made it impossible to eat wheat or dairy. Proponents of the lifestyle argue humans were genetically predisposed to consume food the way our ancestors did, and that mimicking those ancient eating habits can help decrease chronic disease and support a healthy weight.

The millennial version gets specific: You can eat meat, poultry, fish, eggs, fruit, vegetables and nuts. Nixed from the list? Grains, legumes, dairy, refined sugar and vegetable oils.

It’s not surprising that vegetarians are among those eager to give Paleo a go; it was the most Googled diet of 2013 and hasn’t lost much traction. For some, it may be impossible to imagine quitting staples like pizza, sandwiches and ice cream, but thousands have tried. There are hundreds of books and blogs on the lifestyle along with millions offood porn-esque hashtags.

Whether vegetarians should go Paleo is a more complicated story.

For starters, herbivores who want to go Paleo will have to rely on eggs for their main source of protein. Beyond the health risks associated with overdosing on eggs, eating them for every meal could get a little tiresome.

“The most quality sources of protein for vegetarians are prohibited on the Paleo diet,” Alexis Joseph, a registered dietician and the author ofHummusapien blog, told The Huffington Post. No peanuts (they’re legumes). No dairy. No soy. No quinoa. All of these “nos” can make it really tough to get the body the nutrients it needs. Nuts, which are permitted on the Paleo plan, are problematic. “They’re a really good protein, but they’re extremely high in calories,” Joseph says.

Joseph is also skeptical of the entire diet. “We can’t mimic cavemen. They had to hunt and gather for their food — which was physically taxing. Their meat wasn’t factory-farmed and saturated with antibiotics, pesticides and chemicals.” Plus, she says, many of the animals hunted by our cave-dwelling ancestors are now extinct. Paleo diets often emphasize a meal plan low in carbohydrates, but the body and the brain run on carbs, Joseph says. “Low carbohydrate, high protein diets can be dangerous for the body. Eliminating legumes and whole grains reduces fiber and nutrients like B vitamins, which are proven to promote healthy weight, reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and lower blood pressure.”

For those vegetarians who are determined to dip their toes into the Paleo fad pool, Joseph suggests making a few modifications to the diet. Incorporate quality vegetarian sources of proteins like lentils, quinoa and beans. The changes will make the diet resemble more of a gluten-free vegetarian meal plan but still promote the essential qualities of the Paleo diet, which can support certain healthy habits, like eating fewer processed foods and hydrogenated oils.

If you’re curious what an entirely Paleo and vegetarian dish might look like, Joseph does have one recipe to share:Joseph says this recipe boasts the good stuff: The sweet potato is made up of complex carbs and beta-carotene, the egg provides some protein and the avocado cubes are full of healthy fat. To make it, scrub a medium sweet potato, stab it with a fork and bake it in the oven at 400 degrees for about an hour. Once it’s cooked, take it out and slice it in half and fill it with cubed avocado and salsa. Cook up your egg however you like (consider prepping it sunny-side up in a bit of coconut oil) and add it to the stuffed potato.

4 Food Rules to Shrink and Soothe Your Belly for a 21-Day Tummy

4 Food Rules to Shrink and Soothe Your Belly for a 21-Day Tummy

 Reblogged: From Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  So, this is a little awkward. But a few years ago, I began to notice that my digestion was becoming less regular. I had almost constant pain and bloating and had gained nearly ten pounds. Then I read the stats: From burps and groans to discomfort and moans, millions of Americans have similar tummy issues. So I did what any health journalist would: I researched the issue, and I asked my staff of editors at Reader’s Digest to help. We uncovered reams of pioneering studies and learned that the very foods that make your belly feel better are the same ones that make it flatter.

It’s a diet dream: an eating regimen that trims my tummy can also solve GI problems like heartburn and reflux, gas and bloating, constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In a nutshell, we found that two keys for a slimmer, happier stomach: balance gut bacteria and lower inflammation. An unhealthy mix of gut bacteria can lead to constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, and IBS. Inflammation can upset your stomach and pack on pounds if it becomes chronic.

I asked Kate Scarlata, a registered dietitian who specializes in digestive disorders, to help convert all of this new science into an eating plan, and I called it the 21-Day Tummy diet. If you follow it, you’ll enjoy plenty of foods that soothe your stomach (I call them Belly Buddies) and eliminate those that aggravate it (I call them Belly Bullies). To start, read up on the plan’s four main food rules:


1. Load up on magnesium-rich foods.

Deficiency in this key mineral is linked to obesity and inflammation. The 21-Day Tummy diet features delicious spinach, brown rice, and pumpkin seeds, among other whole foods, to boost your magnesium intake.

More: 7 Best Foods for Your Belly »

2. Eat plenty of anti-inflammatory fats.

Pair the MUFAs in foods like dark chocolate, olives and avocados that specifically target visceral belly fat with omega-3’s (found in foods like salmon and walnuts) that combat inflammation and the many diseases associated with it. You’ll protect yourself from heart disease, depression, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer, and, of course, gastrointestinal disorders and weight gain.

More: 7 Worst Foods for Your Belly »

3. Cut back on carb-dense foods.

This tip may change the way you look at “good carbs” and “bad carbs” forever. Carb-dense foods can alter the balance of our gut

flora, triggering inflammation. Foods are considered carb-dense if they have a high ratio of carb grams relative to their weight. A small potato, which many consider a bad carb, weighs 170 grams, but it’s mostly water; only about 23 percent of it is carbohydrate. A plain rice cake, by contrast, weighs only nine grams, but almost 80 percent of it is carbohydrate! To minimize carb-dense foods, the 21-Day Tummy diet cuts out sugar, refined carbs, and most grains. Instead, it adds carb-light, natural foods like bananas, potatoes, and leafy green vegetables. Lean proteins and healthy fats are also carb-light.

4. Steer clear of FODMAPs

Clear your system of FODMAPs, the rapidly fermentable carbs or sugars that can play an ugly role in your digestive system, causing gas, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. Everything from the fructose in agave nectar to the lactose in milk can be fast food for the bacteria in your gut, which is bad news for those of us with sensitive stomachs. The 21-Day Tummy diet minimizes FODMAPs, then guides you through a test to see which ones you can tolerate after three weeks. To learn more about the plan and get the book, click here.



Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes

Sorry I haven’t posted much lately,I been pretty busy so I thought I would give you all a little treat here is one of the many Ebooks I was given recently. I thought you all might like to check it out feel free to download a copy for yourself as my gift to you. I have a lot going on right now but I will try to post again soon. To get to this e-book just click the link below, after  you click on the link it will come up again so you will have to click the link again and it will bring up the Ebook. I just tried it myself to make sure it was working hope you enjoy these yummy treats.                                                                                                                                                              Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes for the New Year from Mr Food


Pumpkin Seeds: Amazing Natural Cure-all


Reblogged: From Yahoo Health


Pumpkin Seeds: Amazing Natural Cure – all Nutrition


Considered medicinal for more than 3,000 years in different parts of the globe, pumpkin seeds have a remarkable array of health benefits, new studies show. Packed with magnesium, calcium, potassium, iron, zinc, and vitamin K, these tasty treats are rated as one of the world’s healthiest foods.


In fact, a recent study showed that pumpkin seeds, which are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, offer a heart-healthy noshing option by reducing blood pressure. Also known as pepitas, the flat, dark-green seeds may also lower cholesterol, reduce diabetes risk, aid weight loss, improve your mood—and even fight cancer.


Here’s a look at some of the surprising ways this super-squash can protect your health.


1. Fights cancer


A new study published in Current Pharmaceutical Design reports that compounds known as cucurbitacins can help combat cancer–and pumpkin seeds are loaded with them. These compounds have been shown to kill various types of cancer cells and also have potent anti-inflammatory properties. “Taking all of these effects into account, cucurbitacins may prove useful in the treatment of different types of cancer,” researchers from University of Valencia, Spain report.


In another new study, German scientists found that eating pumpkin seeds lowered the risk of breast cancer by 23 percent in postmenopausal women. The study involved comparing dietary data from 2,884 women who developed breast cancer and 5,509 healthy women. The study also found that eating sunflower seeds and soybeans lowered risk.


Celebrities Who’ve Faced Breast Cancer


2. Boosts prostate health


Pumpkin seeds are just as beneficial for men, too. Pumpkin seed oil has been used to manage benign prostate hypoplasia (an enlarged prostate). In addition to the oily parts of the seeds, other phytochemicals may also help treat the condition. These compounds can also be found in flax seeds, saw palmetto berries and soy. According to this study, published in International Journal of Oncologya dietary supplement containing pumpkin seed may combat the growth and spread of prostate cancer.


Prostate Cancer: What You Should Know


3. Diminishes hot flashes and improves mood


Looking for a natural way to cool off from hot flashes? A 2011 double-blinded study suggests that pumpkin seed oil can reduce hot flashes, headaches, and joint pain and improve mood swings in post menopausal women, compared to a control group of women who were given lookalike capsules containing wheat germ oil. The same study noted that pumpkin seed oil improved women’s HDL (good) cholesterol levels and reduced blood pressure.


4. Lower bad cholesterol


In addition to boosting levels of HDL, pumpkin seeds contain phytosterols. In one analysis of 16 previous studies involving 509 people, these compounds reduced LDL (bad) cholesterol by an average of 13 percent, while total cholesterol dropped by 10 percent. Phytosterols work by blocking the absorption of cholesterol in your intestines and can lower the amount of cholesterol in your blood. A 2011 study recommended daily intake of phytosterol-rich foods as a natural way to lower cholesterol and reduce heart disease risk.


5. Decrease the risk of diabetes


In the world of super foods, pumpkin seeds are a must-try for diabetics. They are high in iron and heart-healthy unsaturated fats. In animal studies, researchers have indicated that the compounds in pumpkin may be successful in managing insulin levels and diabetes risk.


In fact, pumpkin was so beneficial in improving the health of diabetic mice that the Chinese researchers recommended that its compounds be developed into a new anti-diabetic medication for people.


6. Drive weight loss


Pumpkin seeds may also help you shed pounds. They are packed with fiber and protein—two important components for weight loss. Just one ounce of pumpkin seeds includes five grams of protein, which can keep you fuller longer.


Chow down in moderation, because a cup of pumpkin seeds in the shell contains about 285 calories, along with 12 grams of fat, while husked seeds contain 720 calories per cup.


7. Ease social anxiety, depression—and boost your mood


While pumpkin seeds are great for your body, they can help your mind as well. A study indicates that de-oiled pumpkin seed taken with glucose may be effective in treating social anxiety, and it may aid in treating depression. Speaking of mood-enhancers, a recent report indicates that pumpkin may help increase sex drive as well.


11 Symptoms of Low Testosterone


8. Ease arthritis


You may be able to eat your way to arthritis relief by snacking on pumpkin seeds. A 2005 study found that pumpkin oil reduces inflammation that causes arthritis. Pumpkin seed oil has the effects of indomethacin, a popular anti-inflammatory drug, and offers an all-natural way to treat arthritis symptoms.


9. Prevent osteoporosis


People with a zinc deficiency may want to consider snacking on pumpkin seeds. They are a substantial source of zinc, a mineral low in many people with bone fractures. In just a quarter of a cup, pumpkin seeds deliver 17 percent of your daily intake value of zinc.



Eating Well and Getting Fit

Reblogged:from merckengage.com                                                                                                                                                                                                             If you’re struggling to find a healthy eating plan that works for you.Or your looking for an exercise plan that you can devote yourself to. This website can help you do just that. They will help you put together an eating plan that fits you’r needs based on things you like.Think about it, if you don’t like the foods in your plan chances are your not going to stick with it very long.So it’s very Important that you think carefully when putting together you’re personal eating plan.Choosing differant food combinations that you will want to eat, and even enjoy. They can also help you with an exercise program based on the activities you like. Exercise is just as Important by that I mean you have to enjoy it or you’re not going to want to do it. There are lots of ways to get exercise so think about different activities you like to do when putting together your exercise program.MerckEngage has a lot of great resources For more Info visit http://www.merckengage.com

                                                                             Eating Well

Your personal Meal Planning tool is waiting. Get great-tasting recipe ideas for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks—all based on your preferences.

The Meal Planning tool can help you create a customized healthy eating plan based on your health goals, the types of foods you like, and any dietary requirements you may have.

                                                                      Getting Fit

Physical activity may be one of the healthiest things you can do for yourself at any age, and having an activity plan is an important step in becoming more active.

In this Getting Fit section you’ll find plenty of information and motivation. You also can create an activity plan and find lots of activities to try.

The Activity Planning tool will help you create a customized plan based on your goals, the types of activities you like, and the time you have to be active each week.

Thanksgiving Calories: How Much Exercise It Takes To Burn Off That Feast

 Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                      Thanksgiving Calories:How Much Exercise It Takes To Burn Off That Feast

Turkey with gravy, stuffing, buttery mashed potatoes, pecan pie with vanilla ice cream — if you’re not careful, your Thanksgiving favorites can mean trouble for your waistline.

In fact, the average Thanksgiving mealclocks in around 3,000 calories, more than the Thanksgiving Caloriesestimated 1,600 to 2,400 that women need and 2,000 to 3,000 that men need in an entire day, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Yes, Thanksgiving is a once-a-year celebration; we trust you’re not stuffing yourself with green bean casserole on a regular basis. But we also know that the average person gains about a pound during the holiday season — and doesn’t lose it over the course of the rest of the year.

There are a couple of things you can do to combat the holiday-season bulge. Keep portion sizes in check (this handy visual guide can help) and try some healthy Thanksgiving substitutions, like eating white turkey meat instead of dark, or pumpkin pie instead of pecan, suggests the American Council on Exercise. Stick to your regular exercise routine as much as possible during these hectic holiday weeks, or maybe even try signing up for a local Turkey Trot to make sure you fit in some exercise on the busy day.

In the meantime, let’s put that 3,000 number in perspective: In the slide show below, you’ll find 12 ways a 150-pound person could burn off that Thanksgiving feast, like 13 hours of walking or 17 of yoga. Keep in mind your personal calorie burn will vary with intensity, body composition and weight — and please don’t try these at home!