13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make


Diet and Nutrition

Diet and Nutrition (Photo credit: fantasyhealthball)

13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make

      Reblogged From:Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Get this: 30% of all New Year’s resolutions are broken before February, according to a poll by the time management firm Franklin Covey. “People tend to fall off the weight-loss wagon so quickly because their goals are unrealistic,” says Toby Amidor, a registered dietitian based in New York City. “When people feel as though they’ve failed, they tend to throw in the towel for good instead of giving their resolution another shot.” Here, four of the nation’s top diet experts reveal common weight loss resolutions that almost always backfire.

“I want to lose 20 pounds”

“Dropping 20 pounds is a great long-term goal, but dieters tend to fall off track when they have such a lofty resolution,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Lose 1 pound per week
“Instead of taking on such a big task, focus on losing one pound a week by setting small diet and exercise goals,” suggests Amidor. “For example, resolve to pick skim dairy over whole and pledge to work out 30 minutes, three times a week. You’ll be surprised how small tweaks can result in major change.”

5 Reasons New Year’s Resolutions Fail

“I’m going to try the ________ diet”

Fill in the blank with any fad diet and you’re doomed for failure. A typical diet-of-the-moment requires cutting out one or more major food groups, like fruits, grains, or meats. That’s simply unhealthy and can also prove overwhelming, says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Eat lean protein and veggies at every meal
A well-balanced and properly portioned eating plan that includes a variety of produce and lean meats (and the occasional sweet treat!) will always be the ticket to long-term weight loss, Amidor says.

“I’m going to stop eating at restaurants”

Nixing a night out with friends for the sake of your diet is no way to live, says Amidor. You’ll only wind up frustrated and will be more likely to fall off the wagon.

Revised resolution: Order smarter at restaurants
“Before dining out, have 10 almonds or an apple so you don’t arrive ravenous, and then start with a small salad,” suggests Amidor. In a 2004 study published in theJournal of the American Diet Association, Penn State researchers found that women who started a lunch with a salad consumed up to 12% fewer calories than those who skipped the first course. “Choose a light appetizer as your entree and have the bread basket removed,” says Amidor.

TIME Magazine’s Top 10 Commonly Broken New Years Resolutions

“I’m going to eat 900 calories a day until I lose the weight”

Sure, severely restricting your calorie intake will spur weight loss, but you’ll gain it all back as soon as you start eating normally again (not to mention that starving yourself is dangerous). “This is often the attitude of yo-yo dieters, who go from a size four to a 12 and back again, seemingly overnight,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Develop a healthy eating plan with an RD
If you’re unsure how to lose weight the healthy way, consider making an appointment with a dietitian. “Many RDs now take insurance, so don’t be afraid to ask if yours is accepted,” says Amidor. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has a registered dietitian referral service that allows you to search a database of practitioners across the nation.

“I’m going on a juice cleanse”

After a holiday binge, a detox may seem like a good idea, “but an all-or-nothing approach to weight loss will ultimately fail,” says Lisa DeFazio,RD, a celebrity nutritionist based in Los Angeles.

Revised resolution: Do a mini-cleanse
Jumpstart your weight loss plan with a two-day, 1,200-calorie juice cleanse instead. “Replace breakfast and lunch with a fresh vegetable juice or a protein shake and eat a balanced dinner of whole grains, vegetables, and a lean protein like chicken or fish,” suggests DeFazio.

“I’m going vegetarian”

Losing weight requires burning more calories than you consume, but eliminating meat from your diet won’t necessarily cut your calorie intake. “Newbie vegetarians sometimes gain weight because they are unaware of the hidden calories in vegetarian go-tos like cheese and pasta,” warns DeFazio.

Revised resolution: Reduce your meat intake
“Lean animal proteins should take up no more than a quarter of your plate at each meal,” says DeFazio. Fill the rest of your dish with whole grains, fruits, and vegetables to fuel weight loss. You could also try swapping some of your meat with vegetarian protein sources.

“I’m going to weigh myself every morning”

“Daily weigh-ins are not an accurate gauge of progress,” says Tanya Zuckerbrot, a registered dietitian based in New York City and founder of the F-Factor Diet. Water retention and hormones can mean as much as a two-pound swing in as little as a day. Plus, if your weight-loss plan involves strength training (and it should!), you may even gain weight from increased muscle weight while still losing fat and inches.

Revised resolution: Measure weight loss in inches, not pounds When you feel your pants getting looser as the weeks go by, you’ll know you’re slimming down, says Zuckerbrot.

“I’m quitting junk food”

“Cutting out indulgences may initially help you lose weight, but over time it will make you feel deprived and ultimately lead to bingeing,” warns Zuckerbrot.

Revised resolution: Follow the 80/20 rule
Many weight loss experts recommend making 80% of the calories you consume healthy, and saving the remaining 20% for what may otherwise be considered diet no-nos.

“I’m going to cut calories by skipping breakfast”

Research shows that foregoing a morning meal will put you on the fast track to weight gain, not loss. In a study published in the European Journal of Neuroscience, for example, participants who skipped breakfast were hungrier and more likely to indulge in fattening foods later in the day.

Revised resolution: Eat a protein-packed breakfast every morning
Eating a filling breakfast lessens the chances of bingeing on junk later in the day, says Zuckerbrot. “Pair lean proteins with high fiber, complex carbs—think a veggie omelet with a slice of whole-wheat toast or Greek yogurt with fruit and a tablespoon of nuts—to keep hunger at bay and ward off craving all day long.”

“I won’t eat after 9 pm”

“There is no rule of thumb on what time to stop eating,” says Zuckerbrot. “The body stores any calories that aren’t used for energy regardless of the time those calories are eaten.”

Revised resolution: Sleep at least 7 hours a night
People who skimp on sleep are more susceptible to weight gain, according to a University of Pennsylvania study published in the journal Sleep. Researchers believe that sleep-deprived people tend to consume more calories daily than those who get a full night’s rest.

“I’m going to get more exercise”

“This resolution isn’t specific enough to be successful,” says Jim White, a personal trainer and registered dietitian in Virginia Beach, Va.

Revised resolution: Commit to a set number of weekly workouts
Fitness newbies should start with one weekly workout that combines cardio and weight training, like a body sculpting class or a session with a trainer. After three weeks, build up to two weekly workouts, and over time aim for five workouts a week. Progressing slowly wards off injury and excessive soreness that may prevent or deter you from sticking to your exercise program.

“I’m going to do yoga four times a week”

While yoga is a valuable part of any fitness routine, it probably won’t help you lose much weight. “A typical hour-long session only burns about 200 calories,” notes White.

Revised resolution: Try a variety of workouts
In addition to yoga, include a variety of heart-pumping workouts like walking, weightlifting, cycling, or Zumba in your fitness program to accelerate weight loss, suggests White.

“I’m going to the gym for two hours every day”

Working out two hours a day is not only boring, but it can also cause injury in newbies who aren’t used to being physically active, warns White.

Revised resolution: Do efficient workouts
Trade in long sweat sessions for high intensity, 30-minute interval workouts—you won’t burn out as quickly and you’ll actually torch more calories than doing long, drawn-out workouts,” says White. Plus, researchers from the University of Western Australia found that interval training helps suppress post-workout appetite, further accelerating weight loss.

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Get Kids to Eat Their Vegetables—Really!


  Reblogged:from grandparents.com

     I stumbled upon this site taking a survey and I must say I truly enjoyed It.  They have a lot of great stuff so all you grandparents out there should check this out.                                                                                                                                                                    5 ways to finally stop the food fights and create kid-friendly meals.                                                                                                                                                                  You’ve had the fight a thousand times: You serve up veggies with dinner, and your grandchild crosses her arms and says “no way.” Believe it or not, these struggles often don’t get kids to eat more healthfully. In fact, a Ohio State study of more than 6,000 kids and teens found that about a third of the vegetables kids ate was in the form of fried potatoes (as in potato chips and French fries). And almost 80% of high schoolers don’t eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day, the guideline recommended in the food pyramid. Kids may not gravitate to veggies, but there may also be something else going on. “Sometimes, in our efforts to get kids to like vegetables, we inadvertently bias kids against them,” explains Laura Jana, M.D., an Omaha-based pediatrician.  She should know—she’s both a mother of three and author of the book Food Fights. If the food fights are fraying your nerves, take heart. We’ve got the solutions to help you create kid-friendly meals.                                                                                                                                                                                      Grandkids whine: “I hate the smell!”                                                                                           Reality: There may be something to this. According to researchers, although people say they don’t like the ‘taste’ of cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower and cabbage, what they’re most likely reacting to is the smell of those vegetables. In fact, the smell is so powerful that in tests, even animals ran the other way.                                                           Kid-friendly solution: Hide the offender inside kid-popular foods, like mac-and-cheese and even brownies. Missy Chase Lapine, author of The Sneaky Chef, has lots of helpful and ingenious recipes for hiding top offenders like spinach, cauliflower, and more.

Grandkids whine: “But you don’t like them, either!”                                                  Reality: Kids are impressionable. And if they see you make a face after eating a food, chances are they’ll make one, too. French researchers have shown that emotions on other people’s faces can have a powerful effect on our own desire to eat particular foods. When there’s positivity surrounding vegetables and other healthy foods like fruits and whole grains, children—who are like sponges—take that all in, says Elizabeth Ward, registered dietitian, mother of three, and author of MyPlate for Moms, How to Feed Yourself and Your Family Better.                                                                                                                                                              Kid-friendly solution: Be conscious of that grimace you might be tempted to make when you spear your own Brussels sprout. Smile…and your grandchild will smile along with you.

Grandkids whine: “You can’t tell me what to do!” (Often not spoken, but implied with crossed arms, pursed lips, and a look of defiance.)                                                              Reality: Kids like to feel in control.                                                                                           Kid-friendly solution: Give your grandkids a choice, as in, “Do you want peas or broccoli with your chicken?” and they’ll be less likely to turn you down. “This gives children some power and authority over what they’re eating; even if they choose the same vegetable every time, they’re still getting a vegetable,” Ward says.

Grandkids whine: “I want soda/juice/milk with that!”                                                      Reality: Mixing the taste of vegetables with other flavors might succeed in tempering the unpleasant taste, but it won’t necessarily get the kids to eat more of them.                        Kid-friendly solution: Serve only water with meals. Taste preferences are highly influenced by repeated exposure to particular food and drink pairings. Based on this fact, new research has demonstrated that when preschoolers were given water as opposed to a sweetened beverage, they ate more raw vegetables (like carrots and red peppers). Why? Children have learned to associate sweet, highly caloric drinks like soda and fruit juices, with salty and fatty foods, like French fries.                                                              Grandkids whine: “Vegetables are boring!”                                                                              Reality: Next to things like chicken nuggets, hot dogs, and pasta (most kids’ foods of choice), broccoli and spinach can’t compete.                                                                               Kid-friendly solution: Try combining veggies with foods you know your grandchild likes, suggests Bonnie Taub-Dix, R.D., a registered dietitian and author of Read it Before You Eat It. “As a child, my son loved mandarin oranges, so I made him a salad with a bit of lettuce and lots of oranges,” she says. Over time, you can change the ratio until you end up with more greens on the plate than oranges. Taub-Dix also suggests playing a blindfolded, “taste-test” game of “name that veggie” as a way of exposing them to new tastes, while having fun doing it.                                                                                                Brussels sprout, Dietitian, Eating, Food, French fries, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Missy Chase Lapine, MyPlate, Nutrition, Vegetable

Tips from ‘The Biggest Loser’


Biggest Loser Pinoy Edition JM Oloris

Biggest Loser Pinoy Edition JM Oloris (Photo credit: audiovisualjunkie)

Reblogged: from WebMD                                   Here are some great tips from The Biggest Loser show that you can use at home to guide you along your weight loss jorney.They have also provided a sample meal plan.                            There are multiple factors that can trigger a person to finally make the necessary changes to lose weight. It could be a trip to the doctor and a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or heart disease. Parents who cannot participate in family life (because of weight or health issues) are motivated by their desire to be able to join their kids. Other motivators are negative experiences, such as trying to squeeze into an airline or movie theater seat, buying extra large-sized clothing, or no longer being able to wear their wedding ring. The psychological impact of feeling inferior because of size or any of the stigmas associated with overweight people can be powerful motivators to get down to a healthier weight.What are some of the habits that caused the contestants to become overweight?

No two people are alike, but in general, before coming to The Biggest Loser ranch, contestants skipped meals, ate large portions, drank too many liquid calories, ate too much white stuff (sugar, potatoes, rice, pasta, bread), and did not get enough exercise or eat enough fruits and vegetables. Most people didn’t have a diet plan, ate on the run, standing up, in their cars, or at their desks. Most importantly, they prioritized everything over their own health, and food was more important than the number on the scale.

Can someone at home expect to see results similar to the contestants on the show?

Yes, they can be successful, but not in the same way as the contestants on the show. It is a reality show, but it is not reality for most people to have a trainer, incredible equipment, fabulous food, cooking experts, and the luxury of weight loss as your full-time job.

And don’t expect huge weekly weight loss like on the show. Shoot for 2-3 pounds a week. Larger people may lose more in the beginning, and anyone who has never exercised will see bigger results once they start moving more.

We try to impart education on the show to help people lose weight at home. Seeking professional help from doctors and registered dietitians, along with using our guidelines, can help most people find success.What are your best weight loss tips to help people at home get results?

If you really want to get the scale moving, one of the biggest first steps is to lose the white stuff, like sugar, white bread, pasta, rice, and potatoes. It sounds simple, but can be a really big change. Most people don’t realize how much sugar and refined flour is in condiments, breads, tortillas, muffins, baked goods, and bagels. Start by replacing white bread, rice, and pasta with whole grains, and instead of cakes, cookies, and candies, eat more fruit.

Keep in mind that the quality of the calories is just as important as the quantity. If you focus more on eating nutrient-rich foods, you don’t have to worry as much about calories.

Start recording what you eat in a food record. Just by writing down what you eat, you take ownership that you ate it — and that can be a powerful motivator to eat more healthfully.

Find a fitness routine that you can stick with on most days.

What type of diet do the Biggest Loser contestants follow?

Calorie levels are individualized for each person, but in general we rarely go below 1,200 or above 2,400 calories per day. With the exception of skim milk, most of the calories come from food instead of beverages because food is more filling than drinks. The food selection is based on nutrient-rich foods that provide good nutrition, fiber, and meal satisfaction for the least number of calories.

Here is the nutritional breakdown of the diet they follow:

  • 45% of calories from healthy, whole-grain carbs.
  • 30% of calories from lean protein from chicken, turkey, dairy.
  • 25% of calories from healthy fats like olive oil, nuts, seeds, and avocado.
  • 3 meals plus 2 snacks daily.
  • 4 cups of fruits and vegetables daily.

When contestants are hungry or tired, we reevaluate the food budget to make sure they are getting enough food to fuel their activities and that the combination of foods is satisfying. In fact, at times we have trouble getting them to eat all their calories. On the flip side, when the scale gets stuck, we might cut back on the grains.

What is the role of a registered dietitian on the show?

Prospective cast members come out for a week, and during that time I conduct a nutritional assessment and diet history. Once they are selected, I see each one for an individualized consultation about their diet plan and give them instructions on the importance of keeping a food record, which they send to me daily. From their food records, I create a spreadsheet to ensure they are getting enough nutrients and food.                                                                              How are meals prepared for cast members?                                             Our goal is to educate them on healthy cooking techniques and weighing and measuring normal portions, and to provide them a full refrigerator of healthy foods they use to prepare their own meals. We have a library of delicious recipes, and bring in guest chefs to share their healthy cooking techniques. For the most part, because their days are so full, cooking is simple. So a typical meal may be a grilled chicken breast, salad, veggies, and a whole grain.

Part of the process is to help the cast learn how to prepare meals so they can continue to do so when they leave the show, because many of them have never cooked and relied on eating out, and on packaged and convenience foods.

What is your secret to helping cast members keep up their new healthy lifestyles when they leave the show?

Generally, if they are still in the weight loss phase, their diet plan does not change much until they reach their weight goals. They also have my contact information if they have questions or need my help.

Most of the contestants continue working out hard and following the diet plan because they all come back for the finale, and that competitive spirit helps them stay focused on eating healthy and exercising. For continued success, we advise them to change the environment that led them to being overweight and surround themselves with people who are supportive.

How does competition help people lose weight?

Whether it is on our show or with your friends at work, contests establish timeframes to help people stay focused on their goal of improving health and losing weight. That sets up the framework that becomes reinforced when the numbers on the scale go down and they start to see positive changes. It gives people happiness, confidence, and a feeling of satisfaction that working together with like-minded people can help you achieve your personal goals.

What kinds of exercise are recommended for people at home?

First, check with your doctor before you start exercising.

Just moving more is a great way to start, and then push yourself out of your comfort zone to be more physically activity. Walking the dog is a good start but it doesn’t constitute a workout. Set up an evaluation with a fitness trainer to establish a basic routine that works all your muscle groups and includes aerobic activity and strength training. Strive to incorporate a workout into your daily routine on most days.

How do contestants keep the weight off after the spotlight is gone?

Long after the finale and lots of lost weight, contestants stay in touch with each other and continue to share a wonderful support system. The support they receive from their communities, peers, family and friends is critical to their continued success. Several contestants flew to San Francisco to compete in a marathon together. They have Facebook groups, and many go on to be motivational speakers to share their success stories. All of these things help them stay focused on their personal commitment to eating healthy and exercising.

Once they achieve their goal weight, they slowly dial-up the calories in increments of 50-100 and dial down exercise intensity to find the sweet spot of maintenance. Many folks continue to keep a food journal. By the end of the show, they are walking calorie counters who understand the role of calories in and calories out as the formula for weight loss.

What motivates most people to keep the weight off?

They are so happy and proud of their accomplishment and never want to go back to those negative feelings associated with being obese. The seductive feeling of happiness and what a healthy body feels like is intoxicating and matters more than food.

Sample ‘Biggest Loser’ Diet Plan

Here’s a sample day on the Biggest Loser 1500-calorie diet plan:

Breakfast

  • 1/2 cup fresh diced melon
  • Oatmeal (1/2 cup dry old-fashioned oatmeal, cooked with 1 tablespoon ground flax and 1 cup water), sprinkled with cinnamon and 1 tablespoon chopped walnuts).
  • 1/2 cup fat-free vanilla yogurt
  • Mint tea

Midmorning Snack

  • 1 fresh pear, sliced and topped with 1/2 cup fat-free ricotta and drizzled with 1 teaspoon honey

Lunch

  • Mediterranean turkey pita sandwich made with one 4-inch whole-wheat pita bread, 4 1/2 ounces thinly sliced lean turkey breast, 1/2 roasted red bell pepper, 2 pieces Romaine lettuce and 2 teaspoons mustard
  • Sparking water with orange slice

Midafternoon snack

  • 1 nonfat mozzarella string cheese stick
  • 1 medium orange

Dinner

  • 4 ounces grilled lean flank steak with 2 grilled Roma tomatoes
  • Large tossed salad (2 cups mixed greens, 1/4 cup sliced cucumbers, 1/4 cup sliced mushrooms) with 2 tablespoons light Caesar dressing
  • 3/4 cup whole wheat couscous
  • 1 cup nonfat milk

Evening Snack

  • 3/4 cup nonfat Greek-style yogurt with 1/4 cup low-fat granola and 1/4 cup fresh blueberries