Thanksgiving Calories: How Much Exercise It Takes To Burn Off That Feast


 Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                      Thanksgiving Calories:How Much Exercise It Takes To Burn Off That Feast

Turkey with gravy, stuffing, buttery mashed potatoes, pecan pie with vanilla ice cream — if you’re not careful, your Thanksgiving favorites can mean trouble for your waistline.

In fact, the average Thanksgiving mealclocks in around 3,000 calories, more than the Thanksgiving Caloriesestimated 1,600 to 2,400 that women need and 2,000 to 3,000 that men need in an entire day, according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Yes, Thanksgiving is a once-a-year celebration; we trust you’re not stuffing yourself with green bean casserole on a regular basis. But we also know that the average person gains about a pound during the holiday season — and doesn’t lose it over the course of the rest of the year.

There are a couple of things you can do to combat the holiday-season bulge. Keep portion sizes in check (this handy visual guide can help) and try some healthy Thanksgiving substitutions, like eating white turkey meat instead of dark, or pumpkin pie instead of pecan, suggests the American Council on Exercise. Stick to your regular exercise routine as much as possible during these hectic holiday weeks, or maybe even try signing up for a local Turkey Trot to make sure you fit in some exercise on the busy day.

In the meantime, let’s put that 3,000 number in perspective: In the slide show below, you’ll find 12 ways a 150-pound person could burn off that Thanksgiving feast, like 13 hours of walking or 17 of yoga. Keep in mind your personal calorie burn will vary with intensity, body composition and weight — and please don’t try these at home!

Advertisements

Fat In Foods: 7 Eats With More Fat Than A Stick Of Butter


Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                                       You wouldn’t sit down to dinner at your favorite restaurant and order a stick of butter a la carte. You’re too smart for that — you know there’d be lots of calories and little nutrients and, most of all, lots and lots of fat.

But some of the cheesy entries and meaty meals you’re ordering are packed with just as much fat — or more. There’s a total of 92 grams of fat in a stick of butter, much more than the maximum amount recommended for an entire day on a healthy diet.

The Dietary Guidelines For Americans recommend limiting fat intake to 20 to 35 percent of your daily calories. (A gram of fat provides 9 calories.) For a 2,000- calorie -a-day diet, that means anywhere from 44 to 78 grams of fat a day won’t push you over the edge. Most Americans don’t have to worry about not getting enough fat; in fact, our diets are too heavy in saturated and trans fats and skimpy on the healthy, unsaturated kind, found in good-for-you foods like fish, olive oil and nuts.

Unfortunately, it’s too easy to find foods — especially on the menus of your favorite chain restaurants — that trample those daily fat recommendations in one fell swoop. Here are seven of the worst offenders. Let us know in the comments what other fat traps you’ve spotted — or even eaten!    When health experts say to eat fish a couple of times a week, they don’t mean any and all fish.
Not only are certain types healthier for you (and the environment), but how the fish is prepared also makes a big difference, with fried dishes of course being the worst offenders.
No one expects fish and chips to be a healthy choice, but Applebee’s New England Fish & Chips has a jaw-dropping 138 grams of fat, about the same as one and a half sticks of butter and more than enough fat for three days.                                                                                                  diet, Health, Human nutrition, Nutrition, Butter, Calorie, Diet food, Gram, Olive oil, Saturated fat, Fat, Trans fat, Applebee, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, fat in food, fats in food, fatty foods, fat food