Turkey fights back at ballooning weight gain


In Turkey, the land of kebab and sweet lokum, expanding waistlines are the target of a new anti-obesity campaign by the government to help one million Turks slim down over the next year.

The numbers are staggering: a little over one out of every three people is obese, according to health ministry figures. Even more when it comes to women.

The fight against obesity starts now,” say publicity spots rolled out by the ministry to push back against lifestyle changes doctors believe are bulking up the 73 million population.

“Modern-day life has set constraints that make us eat faster and more without paying attention to the quality of the food we’re ingesting,” said pediatrician Murat Tuncer, a specialist in blood disorders.

But on the upside, he added, as a Mediterranean country Turkey has all the vegetables, fruit and fish required for a healthy diet.

The ministry sounded the alarm on the problem last month.

“Thirty-five percent of the population is obese,” said Health Minister Rep Akdag, who himself recently set an example by losing 10 kilograms (22 pounds) and recommends a walking regime of 10,000 steps a day.

With more and more Turks in treatment for obesity-triggered diseases such as hypertension and diabetes, the government has started pushing health and dietary tactics, along with the television and newspaper ads, to urge Turks to eat less and work to lose weight.

Over the summer, family doctors will distribute pedometers, so people can record their walking distance, and monitor the progress of their overweight patients.

And in a change introduced July 1, bread is now sold with less salt and more whole-wheat flour, making it richer in fibre, a key change for a country where bread is a mainstay of the national diet,

To prevent childhood obesity, Turkish television will only air adverts for healthy food and a balanced diet.

The campaign comes at a time when obesity — recognised since 1997 as a disease by the World Health Organisation (WHO) — is increasingly a global issue.

A person is considered overweight if his body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight, is over 25, while a BMI over 30 qualifies one as obese.

A study published in June by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and based on 2005 figures, showed that 74 percent of the North American population was overweight, with 56 percent in Europe, 29 percent in Africa and 24 percent in Asia.

“The average (weight) is increasing everywhere. Everybody is getting fatter, even the thin people are getting fatter,” co-author Ian Roberts told AFP at the time.

In Turkey, the world’s 17th biggest economy, the number of people treated for diabetes has gone up 90 percent in 12 years, said Yunus Yavuz, a specialist in metabolic diseases.

But there is hope.

Obesity is a preventable disease. It’s enough to slim down to extend your life expectancy and quality of life,” Yavuz said.

And for those with extreme BMI, surgery is always an option. Thirty-four year-old Gullah Bulbul recently went in for a gastrectomy after weighing in at 147 kilograms.

“Whenever I entered a clothes store, they would tell me, ‘there is nothing here for you,” she said after the surgery.

“I wasn’t suffering from a physical problem but a psychological one,” she added

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Obesity Might Hinder Treatment of Some Breast Cancers


 Reblogged:from Yahoo News                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     British researchers looked at 54 postmenopausal women with estrogen  receptor-positive breast cancer, meaning that the tumor may grow in the  presence of estrogen. More than three-quarters of breast cancers require  estrogen to grow, so blocking the production or action of estrogen is one  of the main ways to treat the disease.Breast cancer awareness

The researchers found that obese breast cancer patients had higher  levels of estrogen than women of normal weight.

The women in the study also were compared according to their body-mass  index (BMI). BMI is a measure of obesity based on height and weight, and a  BMI of 30 is considered the threshold for obesity. Women with a BMI of 30  to 35 had about three times higher levels of estrogen in their blood than  those with a BMI of less than 25, the researchers reported July 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

After treatment with hormone-suppressing drugs, estrogen levels in the obese women dropped significantly, but still remained at more than double  the levels seen in women of normal weight.

The researchers emphasized that women undergoing breast cancer  treatment should not be concerned by the findings. They also said the  study results may lead to improvements in doctors’ ability to select the  best treatment for overweight and obese breast cancer patients.

“Our findings are based on laboratory studies, so we would need to  carry out clinical trials to tell us whether women with a higher BMI would  benefit from changes to their treatment,” study senior author Mitch  Dowsett, a team leader in the Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre  at the Institute of Cancer Research in London, said in an institute news  release.

“Women with higher BMI should certainly not be alarmed by this finding  or stop taking their treatment,” he said. “[However], our study takes us a  step closer to understanding which of the treatment options available  might be the most suitable for individual women.”

Weight Loss Plan


Barry Gourmet moves his body

Barry Gourmet moves his body (Photo credit: Barry Gourmet and Raw)

Weight Loss Plan:                               The Goal to Go For :                                                                     What Is your Weight Loss Plan? To be successful when It comes to Weight Loss you must have a plan, and you have to stick to It. So It’s Important to take your time and think about how your Weight Loss Plan will affect your everyday life. Then you will be able to put together a plan that works for you.                                                                                                                                                                              Since excess weight puts you at risk for many health problems, you may need to set some weight loss plans to help avoid those risks and prevent disease.

But what should be your long-term goal? And what short-term goals should you set to help you get there? You have a better chance of attaining your goals if you make sure that the weight loss plans that you will use are sensible and reasonable right at the beginning.

Here are some guidelines from the experts in choosing weight loss plans and goals.

1. Be realistic

Most people’s long-term weight loss plans are more ambitious than they have to be.

For example, if you weigh 170 pounds and your long-term plan is to weigh 120, even if you have not weighed 120 since you were 16 and now you are 45, that is not a realistic weight loss goal.

Your body mass index or BMI is a good indicator of whether or not you need to shed of pounds. The ideal BMI range, according to the national Institutes of Health, is between 19 and 24.9. If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9, you are considered overweight. Any number above 30 is in the obesity range.

From this point of view, you will need a sensible weight loss plan that will correspond to the required BMI based on your height, because this is the primary factor that will affect your BMI.

2. Set appropriate objectives

Using a weight loss plan just for vanity’s sake is psychologically less helpful than losing weight to improve health.

You have made a big step forward if you decide to undergo a weight loss plan that includes exercise and eating right so that you will feel better and have more energy to do something positive in your life.

3. Focus on doing, not losing

Rather than saying that you are going to lose a pound this week, say how much you are going to exercise this week. This would definitely make up of a sensible weight loss plan.

Keep in mind that your weight within a span of a week is not completely in your control, but your behavior is.

4. Build bit by bit

Short-term weight loss plans should not be “pie-in-the-sky.” This means that when you have never exercised at all, your best weight loss plan for this week should be based on finding three different one-mile routes that you can walk the next week.

5. Keep up the self-encouragement

An all-or-nothing attitude only sets you up to fail. Learn to evaluate your efforts fairly and objectively. If you fall short of some goals, just look ahead to next week. You do not need to have a perfect record.

After all, self-encouragement should definitely be a part of your weight loss plans. Otherwise, you will just fail in the end.

6. Use measurable measures

Saying that you are going to be more positive this week or that you are going to really get serious this week is not a goal that you can measure and should not be a part of your weight loss plan.

This is another reason why you should incorporate exercise on your weight loss plan and focus on it. You should be able to count up the minutes of exercise in order to be successful in your plan.

The bottom line is, people should make-weight loss plans that will only remain as it is, just a plan. They have to put it into action by incorporating goals that will motivate them to succeed.                                                                                                                                                                     BMI, Body mass index, diet, Dieting, dieting programs, Eating, Fitness, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, National Institutes of Health, Nutrition, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Shopping, Top Weight loss, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

Healthy Weight – it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle!


English: The graph shows the correlation betwe...
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Assessing Your Weight

How can I tell if I’m at a healthy weight?

Adult Body Mass Index or BMI

One way to begin to determine whether  your weight is a healthy one is to calculate your “body mass index”  (BMI). For most people, BMI is a reliable indicator of body fatness. It is  calculated based on your height and weight.

To calculate your BMI, see the BMI CalculatorBMI Calculator. Or determine your BMI by finding your height and weight in   this BMI Index Chart.

  • If your BMI is less than 18.5, it falls within the   “underweight” range.
  • If your BMI is 18.5 to 24.9, it falls within the “normal” or   Healthy Weight range.
  • If your BMI is 25.0 to 29.9, it falls within the “overweight”   range.
  • If your BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the “obese”   range.

“Underweight”, “normal”, “overweight”, and “obese” are all labels  for ranges of weight. Obese and overweight describe ranges of weight that are  greater than what is considered healthy for a given height, while underweight  describes a weight that is lower than what is considered healthy. If your BMI  falls outside of the “normal” or Healthy Weight range, you may want to talk to  your doctor or health care provider about how you might achieve a healthier  body weight. Obesity and overweight have been shown to increase the likelihood  of certain diseases and other health problems.

At an individual level, BMI can be used as a screening tool  but is not diagnostic of the body fatness or health of an individual. A trained  healthcare provider should perform appropriate health assessments in order to  evaluate an individual’s health status and risks.

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