What to eat after you workout.

     What to eat after you workout                  Reblogged from : Huffington Post                                                                                 As a sports nutritionist, I consult for pro teams and privately counsel professional and competitive athletes in numerous sports, as well as fitness enthusiasts. Pros and weekend warriors definitely have different nutrition needs, but they do have one thing in common: In order to get the most out of being active, everyone needs to eat properly to help their bodies recover from the wear and tear of exercise.

Here are six rules to follow, and how to prevent overdoing it, which can cancel out the weight-loss benefits of breaking a sweat.

Eat within 30 to 60 minutes after exercise.
If you’ve had a particularly tough workout, try to eat a “recovery” meal as soon as possible. Exercise puts stress on your muscles, joints, and bones, and your body “uses up” nutrients during workouts; so post-exercise foods are all about putting back what you’ve lost, and providing the raw materials needed for repair and healing. In fact, it’s the recovery from exercise that really allows you to see results in terms of building strength, endurance, and lean muscle tissue. Not recovering properly can leave you weaker as you go into your next workout, and up your injury risk.

Think beyond protein.
Protein is a building block of muscle, so it is important post exercise, but an ideal recovery meal should also include good fat (also needed for healing muscles and joints), as well as plenty of nutrient-rich produce, and a healthy source of starch such as quinoa, sweet potato, or beans. These foods replenish nutrients that have been depleted, and provide energy to fuel your post-exercise metabolism. A great post-workout meal might be something like a smoothie made with either pea protein powder or grass-fed organic whey protein, whipped with fruit, leafy greens, almond butter or coconut oil, and oats or quinoa, or an omelet made with one whole organic egg and three whites, paired with veggies, avocado and black beans.

Keep it real.
The phrase “you are what you eat” couldn’t be more true. Nutrients from the foods you eat food are the foundation of the structure, function, and integrity of every one of your cells. Your body is continuously repairing, healing, and rebuilding itself, and how healthy your new cells are is directly determined by how well you’ve been eating. In short, your body is essentially one big miraculous construction site that’s open 24/7. So even if you’re lean and you burn a lot of calories, avoiding highly processed food and eating a clean, nutrient rich, whole foods diet can help you get the most out of all of your hard work, including cells that function better, and are less susceptible to premature aging, injury and disease.

Don’t overcompensate.
If weight loss is one of your goals, it’s important to not overestimate how much extra food you “earned” working out. In fact, it’s incredibly easy to “eat back” all of what you’ve burned. For example, in a one-hour elliptical session, an average woman burns about 490 calories. A large salted caramel Pinkberry contains 444 calories, and a 32 ounce high-protein pineapple smoothie from Smoothie King clocks in at 500 calories. Even if you don’t splurge on treats like these, you may be tempted to sneak a little extra almond butter, or be less mindful of your oatmeal or fruit portions, and those extras can add up. And if you’re going to be eating a meal within an hour of finishing up a workout, you don’t also need a post-exercise bar or snack.

If you sweat heavily, exercise in high humidity (which prevents cooling of the body) or your workouts last longer than 60 minutes, you might need a sports drink rather than plain water during exercise. These beverages are designed to keep you well hydrated, but they also provide electrolytes to replace those lost in your sweat (like sodium, which makes sweat salty; and potassium, which helps regulate heart rhythm), as well as fuel to keep you going. If your workouts are less strenuous, shorter, climate controlled, or not so sweaty, plain H2O is probably fine. The general rule of thumb is to drink at least two cups of fluid two hours before exercise, another two cups 15 minutes prior, and a half-cup every 15 minutes during. Post exercise, aim for two cups of water (16 ounces) for every pound of body weight lost, and monitor the color of your urine — if you’re well hydrated it should be pale.

Watch your alcohol intake.
Many athletes and active people I work with enjoy imbibing a bit after working out. Alcohol in moderation is fine, but be sure to eat first to start the recovery process. Also, it’s important to know that alcohol has been shown to accelerate post-exercise muscle loss and the loss of muscle strength by as much as 40%. It can also interfere with replenishing glycogen, the storage form of carbohydrates you stock away in your muscles to serve as energy “piggy banks.” Less glycogen can translate into a lack of power or endurance during your next workout, so aim for moderation

More from Health.com:

Best Superfoods for Weight Loss
11 Ways to Stop Overeating After Your Workouts
30 Healthy Foods That Could Wreck Your Diet

6 Rules For Post-Workout Meals 


A Little Something from Evertyday Roots

               A Little Something from Evertyday Roots                                                                                                                                                                                                                          So since my last post didn’t work out so well I will be removing it.But this is a little something I received in my first email from Evertyday Roots. So I decided to share it will you instead. If you visit their website you can sign up for updates and you will receive free ebooks.so I hope you enjoy..
Here are some of the most popular remedies on Everyday Roots…

Detox Drink– Feeling a little overwhelmed by the toxins in your environment? This is simple recipe shows you how to make a refreshing drink to help cleanse your body-what makes it so great is that it’s an honest approach to detox, not an empty promise.

Spicy Cider Decongestant– When the tissues start to pile up, this is a go-to recipe. As the winter colds and sniffles begin to fade spring allergies are starting up, and such a delicious, effective, decongestant is sure to be a savior!

5 Healing Honey Infusions– Honey is a wonder substance that is capable of treating a wide variety of ailments. In these 5 recipes, other healing ingredients are infused with honey to create remedies catered to specific symptoms and illnesses.

Homemade Electrolyte Drinks– Colored sugar water-that’s what most sports and electrolyte drinks really are. Instead of glugging a bottle who-knows-what, replenish your system and reward your body with these delicious homemade drinks.

18 Home Remedies for Headaches– Tension or migraine, a headache can be debilitating. Experiencing chronic headaches on a daily basis myself, I have had a long time to come up with these natural remedies to avoid side effects of OTC medication.

6 Natural Remedies for Fleas on Dogs– Fleas will drive both you and your dog crazy, but it’s not unusual for dogs to have adverse reactions to the potent chemicals in prescription flea medication. With these remedies, you have natural alternatives to give you peace of mind.

22 Home Remedies for Acne– What do acne and a donkey have in common? They’re both stubborn. Trying to clear up your skin can be frustrating, but with this long list of remedies you are well on your way to having skin that you can be happy in. 

Want more remedies? Learn how to replace the toxic products and medications in your home with over 215 natural remedies, beauty recipes and DIY household products by downloading our book here.

Dance like Nobody’s Watching!

Dance like Nobody’s Watching!                                                            20150113_211220(1)                                                                             Do you like to dance? I’m sure most of you do. So what’s stopping you, I never used to like to dance.  I felt stupid like I didn’t know how. I thought people would laugh at me. I lacked confidence in myself when it cam to how other saw me. Then one day I was the only one home and I was bored out of my mind so I turned on the stereo system and just started dancing and singing along with the music. It became a regular thing I would do everyday,or whenever I didn’t have anything else to do. If my family were home I would just spend 30 mins or so in my room with a smaller stereo or radio. Depending on how much weight you have to lose. Remember just take baby steps If you need to just start with 15 mins, you can do this every day or 2 to 4 times a week it is up to you and all you need is a radio, and a place where no one can  bother you.20150113_211432 Total  privacy so you can feel comfortable knowing no one else can see you. So you will allow yourself  to let lose and really get into the music. Even if you aren’t trying to lose weight this is a great way to stay in shape. It is also a great way to release stress. After a few days you will  start to notice muscles tightening,they might even start to feel sore. Just work through it. If necessary take a break for a day , but then get back to it. Yes it might take some time to get where you want to be, but if you stick to it and don’t give up you will see results. And as you start seeing those muscles getting tighter, or those unwanted pounds disappearing you will also build self- esteem, and confidence in yourself. So no matter who you are or what your situation is if you can stand you can dance. 20150113_211220(1)Grab a radio and dance it out.

Things That Matter24

Things That Matter24                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   So I just started a new website called thingsthatmatter24, Where I post about all the things that matter,things that really work. Different products, home remedies, tips,and other cool things that really work. So be sure to check it out. Everything I post on thingsthatmatter24 have been personally tested by me. Don’t forget to Follow http://thingsthatmatter24.wordpress.com

8 Amazing Blogger Weight-Loss Transformations

  8 Amazing Blogger Weight-Loss Transformation                                                                                                                                        Reblogged: From Women’s Day                                                                                                                                                                                         If you’re trying to lose weight, health experts recommend writing down what you eat. Why? Because it works! A Kaiser Permanente study found that those who jotted down their intake lost twice as much as those who didn’t. The following eight people not only started a food or exercise journal, but did so for the whole world to see, sharing all or a portion of their weight-loss journey online. Read their powerful stories and check out the drastic transformations.

Roni, 34, from Baltimore

Blog: RonisWeigh.com; Total Pounds Lost: 70  

How I Did It: I finally realized that not everything revolved around how I looked in a bathing suit. I stopped seeking some insane vision of skinniness and joined Weight Watchers with the intent of learning how to eat, not reaching a certain size. The small shift in focus made all the difference for me.
How My Blog Helped: I decided to post a weekly update on my blog to report my progress. This small commitment to post the good, bad and ugly was a huge part of my success. It gave me a place to face the emotional side of weight loss: I celebrated my losses, cried about my gains and vented when I felt like whining.
Top Tip: Set non-weight-related goals to build your confidence. Sometimes the scale will not be your friend, so you should set goals that are within your control: Sign up for a 5K, start a food journal or blog and commit to it, ditch the diet soda, have a four-day-a-week walking goal. Declare the goal, reach it and then set another.

Theodora, 27, from New York City

Blog: LosingWeightInTheCity.com; Total pounds lost: 55 
How I Did It: I started working out with a trainer twice a week and doing cardio three or four times a week on top of that. I cut way back on fried food, refined carbs, dairy and red meat, and added in lots of fruits, veggies and lean protein. After a few months of being a gym rat, I took up running so that I could work out outside. A little over a year later, I’ve run three half-marathons, a marathon and countless other shorter-distance races.
How My Blog Helped: I started my blog for two reasons: to hold me accountable and to help me professionally. I was as unhappy with my career at the time as I was with my body. I started taking pictures of all of my meals and blogging about them, which kept me on track and helped me connect with other supportive, health-focused people. My blog also helped me land my current job as a social media specialist.
Top Tip: Remember that you don’t have to be perfect to lose weight. If you get off track, you just get right back on. Don’t let yourself sabotage the rest of the day or week or month. It’s like getting a flat tire—you fix it and move on, you don’t poke holes in the rest of your tires.

Ben Davis, 24, from Little Rock, Arkansas

Blog: BenDoesLife.tumblr.com; Total Pounds Lost: 120
How I Did It: I went from 15 hours a day of computer games to running, running and more running (short distances at first, then building up to miles). I also started applying healthy eating principles that I already knew but didn’t practice. I would walk in the grocery store and head for the fruits, vegetables and whole-grain breads rather than the frozen pizza section. Simple choices like that really put me in the mindset of eating smarter. I switched out Pop-Tarts and cereal for whole-grain English muffins and smoothies. I switched out McDonald’s for sandwiches and soups.
How My Blog Helped: I started the blog after I made a Christmas promise to my grandmother to get a grip on my life. It served as an easy way for her to keep up with me from New England on a day-to-day basis. Over time, I began to accumulate an audience, so it really kept me on track and helped me stay motivated. I didn’t want to let myself down; I didn’t want to let my grandmother down; and I didn’t want to let the Internet people down, either.
Top Tip: No matter what life change you need to make, do it publicly. Obviously you don’t have to start a blog for the world to see, but make sure you’re sharing your struggles with people who care about you. The natural thing for us to do is hide our vices and try to fix them in secret because we’re ashamed. But I’ve found that, more often than not, people are excited for you, and will be there to support you and help you in any way they can.

Lori, 42, from Fort Edward, New York

Blog: FindingRadiance.com; Total pounds lost: 105
How I Did It: Basically it came down to calorie counting. Since I had so much weight to lose, I actually worked my way through a few different programs like Nutrisystem. During that time, I picked out the things that I liked in each program and figured out how to make it work for me. It took me four years to lose 100 pounds, but I also knew that the changes I was making were changes that I could keep going with and love. I eat a diet that consists of whole grains, lean proteins and healthy fats—with the occasional cupcake in there!
How My Blog Helped: I started blogging my daily eats and exercise instead of writing it in a physical journal to stay on track. When I began taking pictures of my food, I then began to plate it better and make the food look appetizing before I even sat down. I’ve also met some of the most wonderful people online that I would never have met had it not been for my blog.
Top Tip: Speak kindly to yourself. Expecting perfection is setting yourself up for failure. When you allow yourself to be imperfect and not beat yourself up, you will find it easier to make the right choices.

Katie, 22, from Charlotte, North Carolina

Blog: KeepingUpWithKatie.com; Total Pounds Lost: 50
How I Did It: Through portion control and exercise, I slowly lost 50 pounds over the course of about 14 months. Prior to starting my weight-loss journey, I had no idea what proper portions were. My idea of what was “right” was distorted because I was never educated about it. Once I started to pay attention to how many servings I was actually consuming, my body also learned what it really feels like to be hungry and full. I still eat the same foods as before, but less of them.
How My Blog Helped: My blog came after the weight loss as a means of maintaining. After reading several food blogs and being intrigued about the concept, I decided to start my own. It has evolved into my take on healthy living, which involves healthy eating, exercise, indulgence in moderation and spending time with family and friends. Through sharing my daily ups and downs in a public way, I have learned not only how to maintain my weight through exercise and healthy eating, but also to live life without fear.
Top Tip: Step off the scale! Judge your weight loss on how your clothes fit, how you feel both inside and out, and the choices you make. The scale is only a small indicator of what weight loss really means. Being healthy means living the life you’ve always dreamed of!

Lynn, 47, from Pittsburgh

Blog: LynnsWeigh.blogspot.com; Total pounds lost: 168
How I Did It: At first, I lost all of my weight through Weight Watchers online (I never attended a meeting). Only after I lost 110 pounds did I start exercising by walking with a friend at our local track. We started with a mile, and every week added a quarter-mile. I eventually built up the strength to walk a 5K in 38 minutes.
How My Blog Helped: I started my blog after being on Weight Watchers for 6 months (I’d lost 50 pounds by then) to get a big monkey off my back: my scale number. All my life I’ve been afraid to tell anyone what I weighed. What if someone found out? What would they think of me? But it’s not like you can hide 300 pounds, so by “telling my secret,” I found freedom and support from a number of people who were on the same journey.
Top Tip: Never, ever start “dieting” until you’ve done the inside work first. You’ve got to answer these questions first: Why do I want to lose weight? Is it out of self-loathing or self-love? If the answer is self-loathing, a diet won’t work. If you don’t love the “you” that’s 200, 300 or 400 pounds, you can’t take care of yourself the way you need and deserve to as you’re losing weight. Learning to love yourself—or at least care enough to work toward loving yourself—is key to successful weight loss.

Erika, 26, from Miami Beach, Florida

Blog: BlackGirlsGuidetoWeightLoss.com; Total Pounds Lost: 163
How I Did It: I lost my weight by dropping processed foods, cutting down on sugar, lifting a few weights, embracing yoga and becoming a runner!
How My Blog Helped: I began my blog as a way of keeping myself accountable for the things I was learning on my journey toward better health and a more fit body. I could never say “I didn’t know that” if I knew I could turn around and read my own words, where it was essentially me writing and explaining it to myself.
Top Tip: Take stress management seriously! When we feel stressed out, it becomes more difficult for our bodies to burn fat. Find an outlet to relieve stress such as kickboxing, yoga, journaling or sports. Basically anything that will help you relieve pent-up tension and energy.

Amanda, 29, from Troy, New York

Blog: MyNewLife-Manderz.blogspot.com; Total pounds lost: 107
How I Did It: Ditching fast food and becoming active. After I had my daughter, I had takeout almost every night. I had no concept of portion control and often ate until I felt sick. I started to pay attention to portion sizes and weigh everything that I ate. It’s so easy to overestimate a cup of cereal, and if you overestimate 100 calories five times a week, that’s an additional 500 calories! Once I lost about 50 pounds, I started running and eating more veggies, proteins and healthy carbs to fuel my body.
How My Blog Helped: I started my blog when I was already down 70 pounds to keep myself accountable. I was at a standstill with my weight loss and thought that recording what I ate as well as my thoughts would help keep me on track. Eventually my blog took a turn toward a running blog. I started to train for my first half-marathon and documented each milestone. I want people to know that if I can go from being 276 pounds to running marathons, they can too!
Top Tip: Add exercise to your life. Not only does exercise burn calories, but it also makes you feel good. There are so many times that I am in a bad mood and I lace up my sneakers anyway to go for a run.

Happy HolidaysEveryone!

        Happy Holidays Everyone!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                It’s that time of year again: When families come together to celebrate the two most important Holidays of the year.Also two of my favorite. Homes infused with the aroma of Turkeys full of stuffing cooking in the oven, the smell of mama’s fresh Baked Pies on the counter. Mashed Potatoes are made from scratch ( with real potatoes ) Gravy is whipped up using the broth of that yummy turkey. Some fresh vegetables. I always serve two, or three veggies to balance everything out.depending on family size  of course. And  cranberry sauce that plops loudly from a white-labeled can and nerver looses it’s shape.                                                                                                                                                                                               My family gathers at my mothers house every year for the holidays, and although my sibling’s and I help out my mother enjoys preparing most of the meal herself. And there is always enough leftovers to go around. Then my sister and I clean up and pack up leftovers for everyone to take home.

Though I can’t promise there won’t be any bickering,you know how it can be sometimes when families get together. But family is family just the same, even the difficult ones. And they say a great meal means more eating and less bickering. So I found a few great sites with an array of healthy holiday meal recipes hope you enjoy. Wishing everyone a joyful Holiday…

Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes – Food Network, Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes, Menus and Cooking Tips | Eating Well, 34 Healthier Thanksgiving Recipes – Greatist

7 Things Japan Can Teach You About Living A Long, Healthy Life

7 Things Japan Can Teach You About Living A Long, Healthy Life

      Reblogged:From HuffingtonPost                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Japan, the land that gave us such treasures as HokusaiMothra and the delicious snack-stick known as Pocky , offers what may be the world’s best blueprint for a healthy life. Not only do Japanese men and women routinely rank at the top of lists detailing humanity’s longest and healthiest life spans, but, in the most recent World Health Organization study, Japanese women came in first with life expectancies of 87.0 years.

And it’s not all due to genes. We teamed up with Aetna to give a head-to-toe examination of all of the secrets of the Japanese lifestyle, from seaweed to mountain climbing to zen. So while you might never turn Japanese, you’ll be able to live more like them.

They value a seafood diet.fatty fish

The Japanese love them a good fish. According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, Japanese seafood consumption was 55.7 kilograms per capita in the last year of data available. (The U.S. ate just 24.2 kilograms.) The numbers put Japan in the top six of seafood consumption among larger nations. So important is their fish diet that trade groups and bureaucrats promoted a band to combat declining consumption levels among Japanese youth.

(The theme song they came up with goes: “Fish Fish Fish. You get smart when you eat fish.”)

The biggest benefit of eating fish may be this: many people that eat it outlive their fish-phobic friends. The consumption of fish lowers the risk of death by heart disease by 36 percent. More astounding, older people who have higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, largely due to their consumption of fatty fish, lived an average of 2.2 years longerthan those with lower levels. Diets heavy in fatty fishes are also proven to elevate mood and prevent certain types of cancer and inflammation.

Scientists recommend eating two servings of fatty fish, like tuna or salmon, each week. For best results, make sure you poach, grill or steam it.                                                                                                                                                              But they don’t forget about all the other bounty of the sea.


The U.N. reports that Japan consumes about 100,000 tons of seaweed per year. And they aren’t picky about type: The Japanese use over 20 species of the stuff in their cuisine. In fact, residents of Japan’s southernmost island of Okinawa, known for breeding centenarians,eat more seaweed than anywhere else in the world.

Okay, but is kelp actually good for you? All signs suggest it is — amazingly so. Seaweed packs between 2 and 9 grams of protein per cup, and some varieties deliver exponentially more potassium than a banana. It’s also the rare food to contain natural iodine — a useful thing for regulating thyroids. Additionally, Harvard researcherstheorize that seaweed’s ability to regulate estrogen and estriadollevels may explain the island nation’s significantly low rates of breast cancer. (They may also ease symptoms of PMS.)

If you don’t like the flavor, you have options. (See: seaweed pasta.) That being said, seaweed is so nutrient-dense it can have side effects.Limit your intake of certain varieties to two tablespoons per week. But don’t worry too much; your sushi rolls are still good to go.

They made singing a national pastime. 

Visitors might be shocked at just how prevalent — as in, it’s everywhere— karaoke is in Japan. The numbers do a little to help demonstrate the size of the Japanese pastime: In 2010, the Japanese karaoke industryraked in over 10 billion dollars. (To put that in perspective, that same year its film industry took in a record high 2.66 billion dollars.) The largest karaoke chain, Big Echo, operates in 229 locations across the country.

Well, here’s some good news for all the singers out there: Karaoke is good for you. In a 2009 study of almost 20,000 men, researchers at the Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine and Osaka University found that moderate drinking with friends improves cardiovascular health. To quote the study’s author: “Singers use deep breathing, which is good for the nervous system. After singing, they usually receive applause. It is a good kind of social support, and helps in the face of adverse occasions or stressful events.”

So gather some friends, and belt out a few notes.

One word: fermentation.

We’re not talking sake here (although there’s evidence that it might have some benefits when imbibed in moderation). No, Japanese cuisine is rich in fermented foods, from the colorful tsukemono, or pickled side dishes, that paint every meal to the ubiquitous soy sauce, of which the average Japanese consumes 1.8 gallons per year. Japanese staples like soy, miso and the not-for-newbies bean paste natto are all achieved through fermentation.

In Japanese fermentative processes, fungal agent koji acts as the world’s tiniest mama bird, partially digesting food before it reaches human mouths. Research suggests that fermentation not only eases digestion, but also strengthens the immune system — scientists notethat the vast majority of immune cells live in our guts.

You don’t need more than a few servings a week for a benefit. Add miso paste as a marinade to your dishes, and enjoy better health and the amazing flavor.

The Japanese go green. 

japanese forest shrine
You might think the entire archipelago is covered in vast cities, but it’s actually pretty green; portions of the country are temperaterainforests. Given its beauty, it’s not surprising that reverence for nature has rooted its way into Japanese culture.

The Japanese government cemented nature-loving as policy when itapproved the country’s 16th national holiday, Mountain Day, which celebrates exactly what you think it would. And Japanese octogenarians have set records for mountain climbing. (Yes, an 80-year old climbed Everest. Feel bad about sitting on the couch tonight.) Furthermore, the Japanese are pioneering forest therapy, which consists of recuperative jaunts to local green spaces.

Time spent in nature provides serious health benefits. Almost every organ in your body is a battery for Vitamin D, and not getting enough of the wonder-nutrient leads to cancer, autoimmune disorder and arthritis. Furthermore, research shows that time in nature improves cognitive and creative function by 20 percent and 50 percent, respectively.

So do what your Mom told you, and get some fresh air.

They have the best baths.

snow onsen
Bathtime is serious business in Japan. As anyone who has been to asentō or onsen (public baths and hot springs) can tell you, they are an extremely relaxing way to spend time. About 85 percent of Japanese end their day in a bath, and some 128 million bathers visited the country’s public baths during 2010. As early as the 17th century, Japanese medical texts were touting a hot soak as a way of warding off ailments.

As it turns out, they may have been onto something. Japanese scientists confirmed that a bath in mineral-laden water can treat rheumatism, skin disorders and neuralgia. And if, like us, you use bath time for your daily meditation, that has health benefits too: two-thirds of patients who meditate showed significant drops in blood pressure.

Japan always makes time for tea.
green tea
The tea ceremony is a gorgeously stylized ritual in a country full of them. The tradition, studied for years by practitioners, takes place in a small structure modeled to look like a hermit’s hut. The idea is to lead your mind away from the everyday of life.

Despite the specialized ritual, tea consumption is an integral part of the everyday Japanese lifestyle. This habit puts them in the top tentea-drinking nations — ahead of their bigger neighbor, China. Most tea consumed in Japan is green. In fact, without a qualifier, the word for “tea” in Japanese automatically means green.

Green tea is not only delicious (have you had green tea ice cream?), but also insanely beneficial. Studies have connected drinking green tea to reduced risk of heart disease and cancer and higher levels of cognitive function. And Japanese citizens who drank five cups of green tea per day had 26 percent lower mortality rates.