13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make


Diet and Nutrition

Diet and Nutrition (Photo credit: fantasyhealthball)

13 Weight Loss Resolutions You Shouldn’t Make

      Reblogged From:Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Get this: 30% of all New Year’s resolutions are broken before February, according to a poll by the time management firm Franklin Covey. “People tend to fall off the weight-loss wagon so quickly because their goals are unrealistic,” says Toby Amidor, a registered dietitian based in New York City. “When people feel as though they’ve failed, they tend to throw in the towel for good instead of giving their resolution another shot.” Here, four of the nation’s top diet experts reveal common weight loss resolutions that almost always backfire.

“I want to lose 20 pounds”

“Dropping 20 pounds is a great long-term goal, but dieters tend to fall off track when they have such a lofty resolution,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Lose 1 pound per week
“Instead of taking on such a big task, focus on losing one pound a week by setting small diet and exercise goals,” suggests Amidor. “For example, resolve to pick skim dairy over whole and pledge to work out 30 minutes, three times a week. You’ll be surprised how small tweaks can result in major change.”

5 Reasons New Year’s Resolutions Fail

“I’m going to try the ________ diet”

Fill in the blank with any fad diet and you’re doomed for failure. A typical diet-of-the-moment requires cutting out one or more major food groups, like fruits, grains, or meats. That’s simply unhealthy and can also prove overwhelming, says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Eat lean protein and veggies at every meal
A well-balanced and properly portioned eating plan that includes a variety of produce and lean meats (and the occasional sweet treat!) will always be the ticket to long-term weight loss, Amidor says.

“I’m going to stop eating at restaurants”

Nixing a night out with friends for the sake of your diet is no way to live, says Amidor. You’ll only wind up frustrated and will be more likely to fall off the wagon.

Revised resolution: Order smarter at restaurants
“Before dining out, have 10 almonds or an apple so you don’t arrive ravenous, and then start with a small salad,” suggests Amidor. In a 2004 study published in theJournal of the American Diet Association, Penn State researchers found that women who started a lunch with a salad consumed up to 12% fewer calories than those who skipped the first course. “Choose a light appetizer as your entree and have the bread basket removed,” says Amidor.

TIME Magazine’s Top 10 Commonly Broken New Years Resolutions

“I’m going to eat 900 calories a day until I lose the weight”

Sure, severely restricting your calorie intake will spur weight loss, but you’ll gain it all back as soon as you start eating normally again (not to mention that starving yourself is dangerous). “This is often the attitude of yo-yo dieters, who go from a size four to a 12 and back again, seemingly overnight,” says Amidor.

Revised resolution: Develop a healthy eating plan with an RD
If you’re unsure how to lose weight the healthy way, consider making an appointment with a dietitian. “Many RDs now take insurance, so don’t be afraid to ask if yours is accepted,” says Amidor. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has a registered dietitian referral service that allows you to search a database of practitioners across the nation.

“I’m going on a juice cleanse”

After a holiday binge, a detox may seem like a good idea, “but an all-or-nothing approach to weight loss will ultimately fail,” says Lisa DeFazio,RD, a celebrity nutritionist based in Los Angeles.

Revised resolution: Do a mini-cleanse
Jumpstart your weight loss plan with a two-day, 1,200-calorie juice cleanse instead. “Replace breakfast and lunch with a fresh vegetable juice or a protein shake and eat a balanced dinner of whole grains, vegetables, and a lean protein like chicken or fish,” suggests DeFazio.

“I’m going vegetarian”

Losing weight requires burning more calories than you consume, but eliminating meat from your diet won’t necessarily cut your calorie intake. “Newbie vegetarians sometimes gain weight because they are unaware of the hidden calories in vegetarian go-tos like cheese and pasta,” warns DeFazio.

Revised resolution: Reduce your meat intake
“Lean animal proteins should take up no more than a quarter of your plate at each meal,” says DeFazio. Fill the rest of your dish with whole grains, fruits, and vegetables to fuel weight loss. You could also try swapping some of your meat with vegetarian protein sources.

“I’m going to weigh myself every morning”

“Daily weigh-ins are not an accurate gauge of progress,” says Tanya Zuckerbrot, a registered dietitian based in New York City and founder of the F-Factor Diet. Water retention and hormones can mean as much as a two-pound swing in as little as a day. Plus, if your weight-loss plan involves strength training (and it should!), you may even gain weight from increased muscle weight while still losing fat and inches.

Revised resolution: Measure weight loss in inches, not pounds When you feel your pants getting looser as the weeks go by, you’ll know you’re slimming down, says Zuckerbrot.

“I’m quitting junk food”

“Cutting out indulgences may initially help you lose weight, but over time it will make you feel deprived and ultimately lead to bingeing,” warns Zuckerbrot.

Revised resolution: Follow the 80/20 rule
Many weight loss experts recommend making 80% of the calories you consume healthy, and saving the remaining 20% for what may otherwise be considered diet no-nos.

“I’m going to cut calories by skipping breakfast”

Research shows that foregoing a morning meal will put you on the fast track to weight gain, not loss. In a study published in the European Journal of Neuroscience, for example, participants who skipped breakfast were hungrier and more likely to indulge in fattening foods later in the day.

Revised resolution: Eat a protein-packed breakfast every morning
Eating a filling breakfast lessens the chances of bingeing on junk later in the day, says Zuckerbrot. “Pair lean proteins with high fiber, complex carbs—think a veggie omelet with a slice of whole-wheat toast or Greek yogurt with fruit and a tablespoon of nuts—to keep hunger at bay and ward off craving all day long.”

“I won’t eat after 9 pm”

“There is no rule of thumb on what time to stop eating,” says Zuckerbrot. “The body stores any calories that aren’t used for energy regardless of the time those calories are eaten.”

Revised resolution: Sleep at least 7 hours a night
People who skimp on sleep are more susceptible to weight gain, according to a University of Pennsylvania study published in the journal Sleep. Researchers believe that sleep-deprived people tend to consume more calories daily than those who get a full night’s rest.

“I’m going to get more exercise”

“This resolution isn’t specific enough to be successful,” says Jim White, a personal trainer and registered dietitian in Virginia Beach, Va.

Revised resolution: Commit to a set number of weekly workouts
Fitness newbies should start with one weekly workout that combines cardio and weight training, like a body sculpting class or a session with a trainer. After three weeks, build up to two weekly workouts, and over time aim for five workouts a week. Progressing slowly wards off injury and excessive soreness that may prevent or deter you from sticking to your exercise program.

“I’m going to do yoga four times a week”

While yoga is a valuable part of any fitness routine, it probably won’t help you lose much weight. “A typical hour-long session only burns about 200 calories,” notes White.

Revised resolution: Try a variety of workouts
In addition to yoga, include a variety of heart-pumping workouts like walking, weightlifting, cycling, or Zumba in your fitness program to accelerate weight loss, suggests White.

“I’m going to the gym for two hours every day”

Working out two hours a day is not only boring, but it can also cause injury in newbies who aren’t used to being physically active, warns White.

Revised resolution: Do efficient workouts
Trade in long sweat sessions for high intensity, 30-minute interval workouts—you won’t burn out as quickly and you’ll actually torch more calories than doing long, drawn-out workouts,” says White. Plus, researchers from the University of Western Australia found that interval training helps suppress post-workout appetite, further accelerating weight loss.

Happy Holiday’s


English: Two New Year's Resolutions postcards

English: Two New Year’s Resolutions postcards (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well just wanted to give a little shout out to ALL my follower’s,  A Big Thank You to you all! I hope everyone had a great Holiday. Now that we’ve all gotten though Thanks Giving,and Christmas,or which ever Holidays you celebrate. Now it’s time to think about  the year ahead,for some maybe a fresh start,a new beginning,or maybe just something you would like to change about yourself,or your lifestyle,a bad habit you would like to break ect…. That’s right it’s time to make those New Year Resolutions! But think carefully before choosing and remember if you make a  New Years Resolution set realistic goals, be consistent ,persistent,stay focused and visualize yourself reaching those goals…   Well good luck and have a Great New Year! Oh don’t forget to check out my next post 13 weight loss resolutions you shouldn’t make..

4 Food Rules to Shrink and Soothe Your Belly for a 21-Day Tummy


4 Food Rules to Shrink and Soothe Your Belly for a 21-Day Tummy

 Reblogged: From Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  So, this is a little awkward. But a few years ago, I began to notice that my digestion was becoming less regular. I had almost constant pain and bloating and had gained nearly ten pounds. Then I read the stats: From burps and groans to discomfort and moans, millions of Americans have similar tummy issues. So I did what any health journalist would: I researched the issue, and I asked my staff of editors at Reader’s Digest to help. We uncovered reams of pioneering studies and learned that the very foods that make your belly feel better are the same ones that make it flatter.

It’s a diet dream: an eating regimen that trims my tummy can also solve GI problems like heartburn and reflux, gas and bloating, constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In a nutshell, we found that two keys for a slimmer, happier stomach: balance gut bacteria and lower inflammation. An unhealthy mix of gut bacteria can lead to constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, and IBS. Inflammation can upset your stomach and pack on pounds if it becomes chronic.

I asked Kate Scarlata, a registered dietitian who specializes in digestive disorders, to help convert all of this new science into an eating plan, and I called it the 21-Day Tummy diet. If you follow it, you’ll enjoy plenty of foods that soothe your stomach (I call them Belly Buddies) and eliminate those that aggravate it (I call them Belly Bullies). To start, read up on the plan’s four main food rules:

Nutrition

1. Load up on magnesium-rich foods.

Deficiency in this key mineral is linked to obesity and inflammation. The 21-Day Tummy diet features delicious spinach, brown rice, and pumpkin seeds, among other whole foods, to boost your magnesium intake.

More: 7 Best Foods for Your Belly »

2. Eat plenty of anti-inflammatory fats.

Pair the MUFAs in foods like dark chocolate, olives and avocados that specifically target visceral belly fat with omega-3’s (found in foods like salmon and walnuts) that combat inflammation and the many diseases associated with it. You’ll protect yourself from heart disease, depression, type 2 diabetes, stroke, cancer, and, of course, gastrointestinal disorders and weight gain.

More: 7 Worst Foods for Your Belly »

3. Cut back on carb-dense foods.

This tip may change the way you look at “good carbs” and “bad carbs” forever. Carb-dense foods can alter the balance of our gut

flora, triggering inflammation. Foods are considered carb-dense if they have a high ratio of carb grams relative to their weight. A small potato, which many consider a bad carb, weighs 170 grams, but it’s mostly water; only about 23 percent of it is carbohydrate. A plain rice cake, by contrast, weighs only nine grams, but almost 80 percent of it is carbohydrate! To minimize carb-dense foods, the 21-Day Tummy diet cuts out sugar, refined carbs, and most grains. Instead, it adds carb-light, natural foods like bananas, potatoes, and leafy green vegetables. Lean proteins and healthy fats are also carb-light.

4. Steer clear of FODMAPs

Clear your system of FODMAPs, the rapidly fermentable carbs or sugars that can play an ugly role in your digestive system, causing gas, bloating, diarrhea, and constipation. Everything from the fructose in agave nectar to the lactose in milk can be fast food for the bacteria in your gut, which is bad news for those of us with sensitive stomachs. The 21-Day Tummy diet minimizes FODMAPs, then guides you through a test to see which ones you can tolerate after three weeks. To learn more about the plan and get the book, click here.

MORE FROM READER’S DIGEST

 

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Dancing Truck Driver Loses Over 100 Pounds


                                                                                                   Dancing Truck Driver Loses Over 100 Pounds

Truck driver loses 100 pounds with Zumba (John Drury)

 

Reblogged:From Yahoo.com

Dancing Truck Driver Loses Over 100 Pounds.Meet Big John Drury, a 43-year-old truck driver who has lost over 100 pounds through dancing. In 2011, the 400 lb Big John found himself having health problems after years of hard 70-hour work weeks driving trucks and eating greasy fast food on the road. But then, John discovered Zumba and eating right. Now he’s a svelte 290 lbs, and teaches his own weight loss dance classes! Check him out… http://screen.yahoo.com/dancing-truck-driver-loses-over-224015505.html 

 

Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes


Sorry I haven’t posted much lately,I been pretty busy so I thought I would give you all a little treat here is one of the many Ebooks I was given recently. I thought you all might like to check it out feel free to download a copy for yourself as my gift to you. I have a lot going on right now but I will try to post again soon. To get to this e-book just click the link below, after  you click on the link it will come up again so you will have to click the link again and it will bring up the Ebook. I just tried it myself to make sure it was working hope you enjoy these yummy treats.                                                                                                                                                              Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes for the New Year from Mr Food

 

I Lost Weight: Holly White Committed To Nutritious Eating And Lost 100 Pounds


  Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                                                             Name: Holly White                                                                                                            Age: 25                                                                                                                                    Height: 5’4″                                                                                                                         Before Weight: 275 poundsI Lost Weight Holly White

How I Gained it: When I was in college, I started eating out a lot at lunch, mostly at fast food restaurants because it was easy to grab a burger between classes. The habit of eating burgers and fries every day stuck with me even after college was over; I continued to eat unhealthy meals when I started working, as well. I would get fast food three to four times a week. I wasn’t eating enough fruits and veggies at the time, either. I would always go for the quick snacks like chips and candy, I didn’t control my portion sizes and I didn’t get enough exercise in my daily routine.

Breaking Point: I couldn’t stand having my picture taken because of the way I looked in photographs. I also got tired of going to the store and seeing all of the really cute outfits that I loved but couldn’t wear. It just really hit me one day that unless I made up my mind to do something about my weight, things would never change.

How I Lost It: I started Weight Watchers again (a few years before, I had actually lost about 30 pounds on the program, but I didn’t stick with it), and I started exercising every day. Exercising is definitely not the easiest or most fun thing when you first get started, but I knew it was something I needed to do in order to lose weight and get healthy. I started off by walking about 25 to 30 minutes each afternoon for about a week or so. Then, I just started working my time up and switching off between the treadmill and bicycle. I would walk outside sometimes, if the weather permitted. Once the weight started coming off, I was more motivated to exercise and continue losing. Now I walk, jog or bicycle around three to four miles every afternoon and I really enjoy it. I just don’t feel right if I don’t do some type of exercise now!

I also make healthier food choices; instead of eating a 100-calorie chocolate snack (even though it may only be a couple of WW points), I go for lots of fruit and veggies because they’re a lot better for me in the long run. I have become addicted to peaches and watermelon!

I think being older and more mature helped me to realize that my weight was very unhealthy and that I needed to do something about it now, not put it off until later. Everyone at work and my family was very supportive and really encouraged me the entire time, which I think is a really important thing. When someone is trying to lose weight, hearing the occasional “How much have you lost now?” or “You’re doing great, keep it up!” is really motivating and helps keep you going even on those rough days!

I definitely feel better about myself, both mentally and physically. And I can wear some of those cute outfits now!

After Weight: 173 pounds

Do These 9 Things in Your Kitchen to Lose Weight


  Reblogged:from Shine                                                                                                                     Do These 9 Things in Your Kitchen to Lose Weight
The kitchen is the heart of the home, but it’s also the place that can make or break you on the weight loss front. If you’re on a quest to slim down, do these nine things in your kitchen.

Make fruits as accessible as a bag of chips: Wash, cut up, and store fruits such as grapes, melon, kiwi, pineapple, and apples in reusable containers in the fridge so they’re easy to grab. Make sure they’re right up front at eye level so they’re the first thing you see when you open the fridge door.

Prepare a big container of salad: Having a salad before dinner is a great way to fill you up so you eat less of the main course, but preparing a salad every night takes so much time that it’s tempting to skip out. Ensure you get a bowl of greens every night by making an enormous bowl of salad at the beginning of the week. You’re sure to eat a salad with dinner if it’s already made – just scoop out a bowl, top with vinaigrette, and enjoy.

Have measuring cups and spoons on the counter: Measuring your food will keep portions in check since overestimating serving sizes is a huge reason people don’t lose weight. Seeing measuring spoons and cups on your kitchen counter will be a visual reminder not to forget to use them.

More from FitSugar: The 6 Foods Every Runner Needs to Eat

Pre-make snack packs: You know what happens when you eat chips or crackers out of the box – you practically end up polishing off the entire package! Take your favorite healthy snacks such as mixed nuts, popcorn, cheese, and fresh fruit, grab some Ziploc baggies, and make some 100-calorie or 150-calorie snack packs you can keep in your cupboard or fridge.

Ditch the unhealthy foods: Your hubby and kids might be fans of an occasional can of soda, bowl of cookie dough ice cream, or Hershey’s Kiss, but if those foods are within your reach, you’re bound to crave them. Throw out or give away the junk because if it’s not in your kitchen, you can’t be tempted to eat it.

Use smaller-sized plates: When we prepare a plate of food, we feel the need to fill it up completely. If you start out with a smaller-sized salad plate, there’s only so much you can pile on, so you’ll end up consuming fewer calories.

More from FitSugar: 4 Monday Metabolism Boosters

Freeze fruits and veggies: Buy larger bags of fruits and veggies at the store and wash, cut, and store them in baggies in the freezer. You’ll not only save money when you buy in bulk, but you’ll also have them on hand to add to your smoothies, yogurt, pasta dishes, soups, and omelets.

Double or even triple the recipe: Whether you’re making soup, roasted veggies, quinoa salad, or something else for dinner, don’t just make enough for one meal. Package the leftovers in containers you can easily grab for the next few days’ meals. If your lunch or dinner is already prepared, you won’t have to resort to unhealthy takeout.

Put food away before you sit down to eat: After you’ve cooked up an amazing vegan mac and cheese, serve yourself an appropriate serving size and then wrap it up and put it in the fridge. If you leave it out, you’re more likely to go back for unnecessary seconds or thirds. Out of sight means off your hips.

It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss


Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                                               It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss                                                                                                                                                                                                                   The heat waves streaking across the country bring up questions in people’s minds about whether they should change their eating and drinking habits in such conditions.

Do our calorie needs change, or does our metabolism increase during the hot summer temps? Well, maybe yes, but probably no. Our bodies are well-tuned to keep things at status quo. If anything, our metabolism may go up when we’re cold, as our bodies need to work harder to maintain our temperature (by shivering). In the heat, our bodies actually slow down a bit to try to conserve energy so as not to overheat. But none of this really makes any significant change in our BMR or how many calories our body needs.

What is important to note is that in hot weather your body is prone to dehydration, and this actually can have an effect on your metabolism. In the course of an average day, sweating, breathing, and waste elimination together leach more than 10 cups of water out of your body — and that’s without exercise. If you don’t replace what you’ve lost, you may become dehydrated; your system literally begins to dry out.

Some people say that their appetite decreases when it’s hot outside. If that’s the case, you should still try to eat small, frequent healthy meals throughout the day. Many people find cool gazpacho refreshing in hotter weather. Try my easy recipe for Icy Gazpacho With Fresh Lime.

The takeaway here: When it’s hot outside, drink plenty of water, and don’t skip your workout! When it’s super hot outside, try not to exercise during the hottest part of the day, especially if you’re exercising outdoors. Early morning and evenings are your best bet. To make sure your body doesn’t overheat, monitor your heart rate. Some people invest in a simple heart rate monitor. It’s also important to don the appropriate workout attire. Don’t wear sweats or heavy clothes while working out when it’s hot. Sweating more doesn’t help you burn more calories; it just may dehydrate you more. And most important, as I mentioned, stay hydrated!

We’re mostly made of water — on average, it comprises around 60 percent of the human body. Specific components of our bodies are even more watery: muscle tissue is 75 percent water, while blood is 70 percent water. Water aids in the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat, and it helps eliminate waste from the body.

Dehydration lowers your body’s energy levels. Because blood is mostly water, when you’re dehydrated the volume of your blood diminishes, lowering amounts of oxygen and nutrients that reach your tissues. Recent studies show there’s a trickle-down effect on metabolism: Dehydration can slow your system to such an extent that you burn fewer calories than you would otherwise during the course of the day. And dehydration can cause other undesirable symptoms, including headache, dizziness, muscle weakness, and a dry, sticky mouth.

If those negative side effects aren’t enough to send you to the faucet to fill a glass, consider that drinking ample water can help maintain a healthy weight. The volume of a glass of water in your belly can make you feel full, and water dilutes sodium levels in your body, combating fluid retention. And if you try drinking a glass of water whenever you feel the urge to snack, you may discover the cause was thirst, not hunger — thereby staving off nibbling.

To stay well-hydrated, follow these guidelines:

  • Aim for eight to 12 glasses a day. Keep a large glass on your desk to track your daily intake. When I’m working at home, I fill a half-gallon pitcher of water each morning to drink throughout my workday. Some days I drink more!
  • Hydrate more when working out. Consume six to eight ounces of water every 20 minutes when exercising, and then have two eight-ounce glasses afterwards to restore fluids. If you plan to exercise for more than an hour, plan for it in advance — up water intake before you work out, hydrate well during exercise, and then chug plenty of fluids after the event.
  • Avoid drinking your calories. Sodas and fruit juices may quench your thirst, but they’re loaded with sugar. Similarly, sports drinks can pack a calorie punch. Unless you exercise for more than an hour, you can replenish your fluids and nutrients using water and healthy post-workout snacks instead.
  • Watch out for drinks that dehydrate. Sound like an oxymoron? Caffeinated soda, tea, coffee and alcohol all have a diuretic effect, causing fluid loss. If you drink coffee or a cocktail, follow-up with an extra water chaser to stay in balance.

If you have a tough time downing enough water, try these strategies:

  • If you dislike the lack of flavor, add herbs like mint or basil, or slices of citrus fruits or cucumber to a pitcher of water. Your next glass will be infused with refreshing taste.
  • Try tea — hot or iced. It’s calorie-free and flavorful. Green tea is another option; its caffeine is surrounded by tannic acid compounds that slow its release into the bloodstream, minimizing its dehydrating effects. Green tea is also a good source of the antioxidant EGCG, which has a mild metabolism-boosting effect. Four cups of green tea per day can kick up your metabolism by 80 calories. Its rich antioxidant reserves are also thought to help combat diseases from Alzheimer’s to cancer.
  • If you routinely turn to other beverages once the day is underway, drink a couple of glasses of water right away when you wake up. You’ll make up for fluids lost overnight and be well on your way to a hydrated day.

The recipe below is for a refreshing drink that’s perfect for spring. Make a jug to keep in your fridge, and you’re guaranteed to quaff healthily all day long!

Zinger Green Tea

Packed with antioxidants, this tea is bursting with flavor, too. Fresh lime juice gives it a tangy zing and a wallop of vitamin C. Makes six servings or 1.5 quarts.

Ingredients

6 cups water 1 cup firmly packed fresh mint leaves 3 green tea bags 1.3 cups agave nectar 1.3 cups fresh lime juice 6 lime slices, for garnish

Instructions:

Bring the water to boil in a three-quart saucepan. Add the mint and tea bags, remove from the heat, and let steep for five minutes. Strain. Stir in the agave and lime juice. Serve hot or iced, garnished with the lime slices.

Mint Factoid: The mint family includes basil, marjoram, oregano, thyme, and rosemary, among others. All are excellent sources of antioxidants. Their leaves have glands containing essential oils, which provide their distinctive flavors.

Nutrient Analysis Per Serving: 43 calories, 0 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 0 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 g monounsaturated fat, 30 mg omega-3, 2 g fiber, 1 g sugar, 13 mg sodium

So how will you take advantage of the summer heat and make it work for you?