The Moment I Knew I Had To Lose Weight (SUBMIT YOUR VIDEO)


Reblogged: from Huffington Post                                                                                                                                      At HuffPost, we’re kicking off an exciting new project and we’d love you to participate! It’s called “The Moment I Knew,” and is a user-submitted video series where readers tell the stories of life-changing moments they have experienced. Each section of HuffPost has chosen a different theme — whether it was the moment you knew you wanted to marry your spouse, the moment you knew your marriage was over, the moment you knew you loved college, or the moment you knew you were broken. You can also tell us about any other life-defining moment you’d like to share. The possibilities are endless!

Here on HuffPost Healthy Living, we’ve suggested that you tell us about “The Moment I Knew I Had To Lose Weight.” For many, losing weight is a lifelong struggle, but we find these moments of realization particularly motivating and inspiring for anyone looking to slim down.

It’s really easy to contribute! You can create your video using YouTube or Vimeo and send the link/URL of the video to themomentiknew@huffingtonpost.com. If you create your video using your laptop or mobile phone and have a video file, please attach the file in an email to themomentiknew@huffingtonpost.com.

Your video submission is subject to our User Terms. Please make sure to include your full name with your video submission. Each video should be 30-60 seconds long, and should feature only you, speaking right into the camera telling your story. Please start your story with the words “The moment I knew…”                                                             Calorie, Dieting, dieting programs, Fitness, Health, huffingtonpost, HuffPost, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, Marriage, Moment I Knew, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Portion control (dieting), Serving size, Top Weight loss, Video, Vimeo, Weight, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips, YouTube

Oatmeal Cake!


Reblogged: from Chocolate – Covered Katie                                                                                                                                   To try this yummy Oatmeal Cake recipe, You will need:                                                                                                                    1/2 cup oats (50g),1/4 tsp vanilla extract, sweetener, such as 1 1/2 T maple syrup or 1 to 1 1/2 packs stevia (I omitted, but I’ve cautioned y’all before about my lack of sweet tooth.) 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce (60g) (Or sub banana. it’s awesome this way!) 1/4 cup milk, creamer, juice, or water (I used 60g) 1/8 tsp salt, Handful of chocolate chips (and a few for the top, too!) Optional: unless you like the taste of fat-free baking, add 1-2T oil, vegan butter, or nut butter (If oil, scale the milk back a little. If vegan butter, scale the salt back a little.) Optional: 1/4 to 1/2 tsp cinnamon (If you like cinnamon in chocolate chip cookies)

Preheat oven to 380 degrees. Combine dry ingredients, then mix in wet. Pour into a small baking pan, loaf pan, or 1-cup ramekin (or, for mini boats, two 1/2-cup ramekins). Cook for 20 minutes, or more until it’s firm. Finally, set your oven to “high broil” for 3-5 more minutes (or simply just bake longer, but broiling gives it a nice crust). Don’t forget to spray your ramekins first if you want your cakes to pop out.

Like a warm chocolate-chip cookie! With gooey, melted chocolate in every delicious bite.Listen up, Calorie Counters: I know that many people who read my blog are watching their weight.You will be excited to know that this oatmeal cake is like three times the size of a Larabar for roughly the same amount of calories!.Can breakfast get any cooler than a personal-sized oatmeal cake? Answer: No. Not unless you decided to add chocolate chips.                                                                                                   Nutrition Facts: (based on the Pumpkin Pie Baked Oatmeal) Calories: 180 Fat: 3g Protein: 7g Fiber: 9g (All flavors are pretty similar, nutritionally speaking. I usually add some form of nut butter to my boatmeal, but I’ve calculated the nutritional info without the optional nut butter for those of you who wish to keep it low-cal.)

.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Here are some other Oatmeal Cake Flavors:

Pumpkin Pie ,Cinnamon Bun,Banana Bread,Oatmeal-Raisin ,Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough

Reading: Japanese Women Don’t Get Old or Fat: Secrets of My Mother’s Tokyo Kitchen


Reblogged: from Just Hungry                                                                                Stumbled upon Japanese Women Don’t Get Old or Fat, when I was browsing around Amazon some time ago. When I first read the title, I laughed. It seemed like a quite obvious attempt to cash in on the success of French Women Don’t Get Fat: The Secret of Eating For Pleasure. Also (and this applies to the French Women book too) it makes such a sweeping generalization right there in the title, which borders on the ludicrous. But I was curious about it so I decided to get it for the sake of research. The short review: it’s not as bad as I thought it would be, and may serve as a good introduction to Japanese cooking, though definitely not the best. The diet and weight loss points made in this book could be summed up in a few bullet points:

  • Don’t overeat – observe the hara hachibunme rule (eat until you are 80% full). Hara hachibunme is a common Japanese term: it appears also in a book I reviewed previously, Hungry Planet,, in the Okinawa chapter. (Okinawa has the most longevity of anyplace in the world.) Another term my mother likes to quote to me quite often is hara mo mi no uchi – your stomach is a part of your body. In other words, don’t overeat!
  • Eat a lot of fresh vegetables.
  • Eat a wide variety of foods.
  • Eat more whole grains – eat brown rice rather than polished white rice.
  • Eat fruit for dessert, or small portions if you must have cake etc.

Obviously, it is not necessary to eat Japanese food to accomplish these goals. But I do agree with the point made in this book that traditional Japanese food is inherently healthy. As you probably know if you have been reading this site, I am Japanese but have lived most of my adult life in other countries. So my everyday cooking is a mishmash of various styles. If I could afford to in terms of both time and money though, I would cook and eat Japanese style most of the time.

Traditional Japanese food centers around rice (gohan, which is also a synonym for a meal), with small portions of okazu, savory things that go well with the plain rice. A typical Japanese dinner would have, besides the rice, 1 small bowl of soup (miso or clear), 1 protein dish such as grilled fish, and 2 or 3 other mostly vegetable-based side dishes.

A popular dietary guide in Japan that has been around for decades is to try to eat 30 kinds of food items a day for nutritional well-roundedness. This may sound impossible, but in Japanese cooking it’s not that out of reach.

But then, there are the French, not to mention the Swiss

If you go to France, most women are not overweight. Many, especially in Paris, are in fact skin-and-bones slim. What may be less known is that here in Switzerland too, there aren’t many overweight people – though older women tend to look more sturdy and well-muscled. Whenever I go to the U.S., or for that matter to the U.K. too, I always get a mild shock when I see the number of very overweight people. You simply don’t see many of them here.

Swiss food is a mix of French, German, Italian and native Alpine – featuring loads of butter, cheese, bread and potatoes. Veal is the most popular meat, especially for company (chances are if you are invited to a Swiss home you’re going to get veal in some form). So why aren’t more Swiss people overweight?

The answers I think are the usual: moderation and exercise. Portions here are quite small compared to those in the U.S. The delicious pastries available at Sprüngli are barely bigger than my palm, and their handmade truffe du jour is so rich that one (and yes, they do sell them by the piece) is enough to satisfy any chocolate urge.

Swiss people also exercise a lot. Whenever we’re invited to someone’s house, invariably we go for a walk after dinner to stretch our legs and to see the neighborhood. The house I live in is on a corner, and I always see couples and families walking or biking past on the weekends. And of course a lot of people participate in winter sports as well as hiking and camping in the summer.

What’s the typical after-dinner-party activity in the U.S.? Watch TV, play video games, or just sit around and chat and snack some more?

Societal pressures

Getting back to why Japanese women aren’t overweight: I discussed this with some Japanese people and we all seem to agree that in Japan, there is a lot of societal pressure to stay slim. Young girls often starve themselves so they can be fashionable. Older women are also quite pressured to stay thin. The standard clothes size in Japan is junior size 11, which is about a size 6 in the U.S. Japan is inherently a conformist society, so it’s difficult to ‘stick’ out in any way, including being overweight.

As far as Japanese women not getting old – they do of course. Do they look younger than their Western counterparts? Often yes, but I think that all Asian women tend to look younger than European-Caucasian women. I still get carded in American bars and I’m nowhere near 21 anymore. As far as the various illnesses related to getting older, while the incidences of heart attacks and diabetes may be low, there are other problems such as a high incidence of osteoporosis amongst older women.

So to wrap up, I would recommend this book if you want once with some nice recipes (though without pictures) of some basic Japanese foods, with some diet advice along the way. But don’t buy into the premise that there is some magic aspect to Japanese food. If you overeat it, you’re still going to gain weight! The main lesson to be gleaned from it is hara hachibunme.

Cholesterol the good and the bad


High cholesterol?
High cholesterol? (Photo credit: Boy27wonder)

 Reblogged:from Smart Balance.com                       The good, the bad, and the difference

Cholesterol is a wax-like substance produced by your liver and found in all parts of your body. It is also present in foods, particularly meats, highfat dairy products, egg yolks and certain fish. Your cholesterol level is measured with a simple blood test that breaks down the amount into three categories:

Low density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad” cholesterol) builds up on artery walls and can cause cardiovascular disease. Levels under 100mg are optimal, and under 129mg is very good. • High density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good” cholesterol) carries LDL out of the blood and keeps it from accumulating on artery walls. Levels of 60mg or more are considered protective of heart health. • Total cholesterol is the combination of LDL, HDL, VLDL and other density lipoproteins found in the blood. Ideally this number should be under 200.To optimize your cardiovascular health, you should strive to keep your total cholesterol levels as low as possible and balance your LDL and HDL as much as possible. In addition to reducing your intake of foods high in saturated fats, you should try to eat heart-healthy foods, like fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthier blends of fat like those blends contained in Smart Balance® Buttery Spreads.   Our unique blend of fats has been shown to support healthy cholesterol levels when eaten as part of the Smart Balance™ Food Plan.1  Regular exercise and a healthy weight also can help you take control of your cholesterol.  Please see the nutrition information of each Smart Balance® Buttery Spread for fat and saturated fat content.                                                                                                                                                Blood vessel, Calorie, Cholesterol, Dieting, dieting programs, Eating, Fat, Fitness, Food, Health, High-density lipoprotein, Human nutrition, Low-density lipoprotein, Portion control (dieting), Saturated fat, Serving size, Top Weight loss, Very low-density lipoprotein, Weight, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

Healthy Weight – it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle!


English: The graph shows the correlation betwe...
Image via Wikipedia

Assessing Your Weight

How can I tell if I’m at a healthy weight?

Adult Body Mass Index or BMI

One way to begin to determine whether  your weight is a healthy one is to calculate your “body mass index”  (BMI). For most people, BMI is a reliable indicator of body fatness. It is  calculated based on your height and weight.

To calculate your BMI, see the BMI CalculatorBMI Calculator. Or determine your BMI by finding your height and weight in   this BMI Index Chart.

  • If your BMI is less than 18.5, it falls within the   “underweight” range.
  • If your BMI is 18.5 to 24.9, it falls within the “normal” or   Healthy Weight range.
  • If your BMI is 25.0 to 29.9, it falls within the “overweight”   range.
  • If your BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the “obese”   range.

“Underweight”, “normal”, “overweight”, and “obese” are all labels  for ranges of weight. Obese and overweight describe ranges of weight that are  greater than what is considered healthy for a given height, while underweight  describes a weight that is lower than what is considered healthy. If your BMI  falls outside of the “normal” or Healthy Weight range, you may want to talk to  your doctor or health care provider about how you might achieve a healthier  body weight. Obesity and overweight have been shown to increase the likelihood  of certain diseases and other health problems.

At an individual level, BMI can be used as a screening tool  but is not diagnostic of the body fatness or health of an individual. A trained  healthcare provider should perform appropriate health assessments in order to  evaluate an individual’s health status and risks.

BMI, Body mass index, Calorie, Dieting, dieting programs, Eating, Fitness, Food, Health, Human nutrition, Hypertension, Loss Weight, Nutrition, Obesity, Overweight, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Programs, Serving size, Top weight-loss, Underweight, Weight, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips, Weight loss

Indian Spinach-and-Chickpea Fritters


 I found this great recipe on the Food Network   check it out you’r gonna love it.                                                                                                                           Indian Spinach-and-Chickpea Fritters                                                                                                                Ingredients

Directions

Whisk the chickpea flour, cornstarch, baking powder, cumin seeds, cayenne and 3/4 teaspoon salt in a bowl. Add 2/3 cup water and whisk until smooth. Add the onion, chickpeas, spinach and ginger to the batter and mix to combine.

Heat 2 inches of vegetable oil in a deep heavy-bottomed pot until a deep-fry thermometer registers 325 degrees. Working in batches, drop heaping tablespoonfuls of batter into the oil (do not crowd the pan). Cook until lightly golden, about 2 minutes, turning as needed. Transfer with a slotted spoon to a paper-towel-lined plate. Cool slightly, then gently press each fritter into a small disk, about 1/3 inch thick.

Return the fritters to the hot oil and fry until crisp and golden brown, about 1 more minute. Season with salt and serve with chutney.

Monounsaturated fats or MUFA


Space-filling model of the α-Linolenic acid mo...
Image via Wikipedia

Reblogged: from en.wikipedia.org, www.mayoclinic.com , www.heart.org

monounsaturated fats or MUFA (MonoUnsaturated Fatty Acid) are fatty acids that have one double bond in the fatty acid chain and all of the remainder of the carbon atoms in the chain are single-bonded. By contrast, polyunsaturated fatty acids have more than one double bond.Fatty acids are long-chained molecules having an alkyl group at one end and a carboxylic acid group at the other end. Fatty acid viscosity (thickness) and melting temperature increases with decreasing number of double bonds. Therefore, monounsaturated fatty acids have a higher melting point than polyunsaturated fatty acids (more double bonds) and a lower melting point than saturated fatty acids (no double bonds). Monounsaturated fatty acids are liquids at room temperature and semisolid or solid when refrigerated.Common monounsaturated fatty acids are palmitoleic acid (16:1 n−7), cis-vaccenic acid (18:1 n−7) and oleic acid (18:1 n−9). Palmitoleic acid has 16 carbon atoms with the first double bond occurring 7 carbon atoms away from the methyl group (and 9 carbons from the carboxyl end). It can be lengthened to the 18-carbon cis-vaccenic acid. Oleic acid has 18 carbon atoms with the first double bond occurring 9 carbon atoms away from the carboxylic acid group.

Although polyunsaturated fats protect against cardiovascular disease by providing more membrane fluidity than monounsaturated fats, they are more vulnerable to lipid peroxidation (rancidity). On the other hand, some monounsaturated fatty acids (in the same way as saturated fats) may promote insulin resistance, whereas polyunsaturated fatty acids may be protective against insulin resistance.[1][2] In contrast to this, the large-scale KANWU study found that neither dietary monounsaturated nor supplemented polyunsaturated fats (in the form of fish oil) affected insulin sensitivity while increased consumption of saturated fat significantly decreased insulin  sensitivity.                                                                                                                                                                            Foods containing monounsaturated fats reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, while possibly increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.[4] However, their true ability to raise HDL is still in debate.Levels of oleic and monounsaturated fatty acids in red blood cell membranes were positively associated with breast cancer risk. The saturation index (SI) of the same membranes was inversely associated with breast cancer risk. Monounsaturated fats and low SI in erythrocyte membranes are predictors of postmenopausal breast cancer. Both of these variables depend on the activity of the enzyme 9-d delta 9 desaturase.[5]In children, consumption of monounsaturated oils is associated with healthier serum lipid profiles.Monounsaturated fats are found in natural foods such as red meat, whole milk products, nuts and high fat fruits such as olives and avocados. Olive oil is about 75% monounsaturated fat. Canola oil and Cashews are both about 58% monounsaturated fat. Tallow (beef fat) is about 50% monounsaturated fat and lard is about 40% monounsaturated fat. Other sources include macadamia nut oil, grape seed oil, groundnut oil (peanut oil), sesame oil, corn oil, popcorn, whole grain wheat, cereal, oatmeal, safflower oil, sunflower oil, tea-oil Camellia, and avocado oil.Monounsaturated fats can have a beneficial effect on your health when eaten in moderation and when used to replace saturated fats or trans fats.  Monounsaturated fats can help reduce bad cholesterol levels in your blood and lower your risk of heart disease and stroke.  They also provide nutrients to help develop and maintain your body’s cells.  Monounsaturated fats are also typically high in vitamin E, an antioxidant vitamin most Americans need more of. Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats can have a positive effect on your health, when eaten in moderation.  The bad fats – saturated fats and trans fats – can negatively affect your health. Monounsaturated fats – like all fats – contain nine calories per gram. The fats in the foods you eat should not total more than 25–35 percent of the calories you eat in a given day…and, for good health, the majority of those fats should be monounsaturated or polyunsaturated.  Eat foods containing monounsaturated fats and/or polyunsaturated fats instead of foods that contain saturated fats and/or trans fats.                                                                                                                                                                                                                  For practical tips, check out the Nutrition Center                                                                                                                 Also  see: High density lipoprotein,Saturated fat,Unsaturated fat,Polyunsaturated fat.                                             Dieting, Eating, Fatty acid, Fitness, Food, Health,Calorie, High-density lipoprotein, Human nutrition, Monounsaturated fat, Olive oil, Polyunsaturated fat, Saturated fat, Serving size, Top Weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight-loss