‘Extreme Makeover': Jarvez Hall Loses Nearly Half His Body Weight


Reblogged:from Yahoo News                                                                                                                                                                                                  Extreme  Makeover‘: Jarvez Hall Loses Nearly Half His Body Weight                                                                                                                                                                                                      By the time Jarvez Hall reached his 28th birthday, he was already dangerously obese.

His weight gain had started years before, spurred by a passion for playing football and encouragement from others.

“Middle school is when I started getting big,” Hall of Portland, Ore., said. “People encouraged me to get big. ‘Oh, you’re big, that means you’re more manly. You’re big. You’re strong and tough.'””So I was actually excited,” he said. “I wanted to be big.”

Hall went on to play football at Oregon State University but eventually  his football career and the weight piled on, reaching its peak as his  beloved mother struggled with sickle-cell anemia.

“When my mom got sick, that is when my weight got worse,” he said.

Hall met the love of his life, Adriana, and asked for her hand in marriage. The day before they walked down the aisle together, however, he wrote a letter to Chris Powell, fitness expert and the trainer on                 ABC’s “Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition,” asking for help.

Watch: Man loses more than half his body weight on ‘Extreme Makeover’

When Powell arrived to help, Hall weighed 548 pounds at his first weigh-in.

“Wow, I look at this number and I’m motivated,” he said at the time. “My goal is to get into the “twos” and officially bring sexy back.”

In the next year, with Powell at his side, Hall pushed through the highs and lows of his weight-loss journey.

“I’m just going to keep pushing because I can’t be 548 [pounds],” he said. “The next number after 548 is death.”

After one year on Powell’s program, Hall weighed in at 267 pounds and had dropped from a size 70 waist to a size 38. His total weight loss came to more than 280 pounds.

“My world is so different now because I can appreciate the small things in life,” Hall said today on ”        Good Morning America” alongside Powell. “Just coming here, I got to fly on an airplane and sit in one seat and not have a seat-belt extender. I don’t have to worry about where I’m going to sit. I can sit in a movie theater.”

Powell says it was the same determination that helped Hall succeed as an athlete that pushed him in his weight-loss journey.

“He [Hall] is the epitome of perseverance and persistence,” Powell said. “He fell sometimes like we all do. We’re all human and it happens on the journey but every single time he did he got right back up. He attacked every single day like it was a brand-new day and he kept going and this is where it gets you.”

Also appearing on “GMA” with Hall was his now-wife, Adriana, the woman who sparked his weight-loss journey on the eve of their wedding. Adriana, who lost weight along with her husband, is now expecting the couple’s first child.

“I can go places and live life with my wife and enjoy it,” Hall said of his new life. “It’s amazing.”                                                                                                                                                                                                   Here Is a link to Hall’s Inspiring Video http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/extreme-makeover-jarvez-hall-loses-nearly-half-body-134034289–abc-news-health.html

How can I keep track of how much I am eating?


 Rebogged:from Weight-Control Information Network                                                                                                                                                                                        How can I keep track of how much I am eating?                                                                                                To control your weight, you need to do more than just choose a healthy mix of foods. You should also look at the kinds of food you eat and how much you eat at a time

A food diary can be a good way to keep track of how much you are eating. Write down when, what, how much, where, and why you eat. This action can help you be aware of how much you are eating and the times you tend to eat too much. You can keep a food diary in a notebook, on your cell phone, or on a computer.

Figure 2 shows what 1 day of a person’s food diary might look like. As shown in the diary, this person chose relatively healthy portion sizes for breakfast and lunch. At those meals, she ate to satisfy her hunger. She had a large chocolate bar in the afternoon for an emotional reason. She ate because she was bored, not because she was hungry.

By 8 p.m., this person was very hungry and ate large portions of food that were high in fat and calories. She was at a social event and did not realize she was eating so much. If she had made an early evening snack of fruit and fat-free or low-fat yogurt, she might have been less hungry at 8 p.m. and eaten less. By the end of the day, she had eaten a total of 3,930 calories, which is more than most people need to eat in a day. Repeatedly eating excess calories over time can cause weight gain.

If, like the woman in the food diary, you eat even when you are not hungry, try doing something else instead of eating:

  • Take a break to walk around the block.
  • Read a book or magazine or listen to your favorite music.
  • Try doing something with your hands, like knitting or playing cards or checkers.
  • Try drinking water or herbal tea without sugar or eating a low-fat snack such as an apple if a craving hits you.
  • If you are at work, grab a co-worker on the job and go for a quick walk.
    Figure 2. Example of a Food Diary Thursday
    Time Food Amount Place Hunger/Reason Calories*
    8 a.m. Coffee, black 6 fl. oz. Home Slightly hungry 2
    Banana 1 medium 105
    Low-fat yogurt 1 cup 250
    1 p.m. Turkey and cheese sandwich on whole-wheat bread with mustard, tomato, low-fat cheese, and lettuce 3 oz. turkey, 1 slice low-fat cheddar cheese, 2 slices bread Work Hungry 363
    Potato chips, baked 1 small bag 150
    Water 16 fl. oz.
    3 p.m. Chocolate bar 1 bar (5 oz.) Work Not hungry/ Bored 760
    8 p.m. Fried potato skins with cheese and bacon 4 each Restaurant/       Out with       friends Very hungry 667
    Chicken Caesar salad 2 cups lettuce, 6 oz. chicken, 6 Tbsp. dressing, 3/4 cup croutons 633
    Breadsticks 2 large sticks 226
    Apple pie with vanilla ice cream 1/8 of a 9-inch pie, 1 cup ice cream 638
    Soft drink 12 fl. oz. 136

    Total Calories = 3,930

    *Estimates are based on the USDA’s online tool that measures diet and physical activity (http://www.choosemyplate.gov).

    A blank version of the diary for you to copy and use is on page 9 of this document’s PDF file.

    Through your diary, you can become aware of the times and reasons you eat less healthy foods or more food than your body needs. This can help as you try to make different choices in the future.

     

Weight Loss Plan


Barry Gourmet moves his body

Barry Gourmet moves his body (Photo credit: Barry Gourmet and Raw)

Weight Loss Plan:                               The Goal to Go For :                                                                     What Is your Weight Loss Plan? To be successful when It comes to Weight Loss you must have a plan, and you have to stick to It. So It’s Important to take your time and think about how your Weight Loss Plan will affect your everyday life. Then you will be able to put together a plan that works for you.                                                                                                                                                                              Since excess weight puts you at risk for many health problems, you may need to set some weight loss plans to help avoid those risks and prevent disease.

But what should be your long-term goal? And what short-term goals should you set to help you get there? You have a better chance of attaining your goals if you make sure that the weight loss plans that you will use are sensible and reasonable right at the beginning.

Here are some guidelines from the experts in choosing weight loss plans and goals.

1. Be realistic

Most people’s long-term weight loss plans are more ambitious than they have to be.

For example, if you weigh 170 pounds and your long-term plan is to weigh 120, even if you have not weighed 120 since you were 16 and now you are 45, that is not a realistic weight loss goal.

Your body mass index or BMI is a good indicator of whether or not you need to shed of pounds. The ideal BMI range, according to the national Institutes of Health, is between 19 and 24.9. If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9, you are considered overweight. Any number above 30 is in the obesity range.

From this point of view, you will need a sensible weight loss plan that will correspond to the required BMI based on your height, because this is the primary factor that will affect your BMI.

2. Set appropriate objectives

Using a weight loss plan just for vanity’s sake is psychologically less helpful than losing weight to improve health.

You have made a big step forward if you decide to undergo a weight loss plan that includes exercise and eating right so that you will feel better and have more energy to do something positive in your life.

3. Focus on doing, not losing

Rather than saying that you are going to lose a pound this week, say how much you are going to exercise this week. This would definitely make up of a sensible weight loss plan.

Keep in mind that your weight within a span of a week is not completely in your control, but your behavior is.

4. Build bit by bit

Short-term weight loss plans should not be “pie-in-the-sky.” This means that when you have never exercised at all, your best weight loss plan for this week should be based on finding three different one-mile routes that you can walk the next week.

5. Keep up the self-encouragement

An all-or-nothing attitude only sets you up to fail. Learn to evaluate your efforts fairly and objectively. If you fall short of some goals, just look ahead to next week. You do not need to have a perfect record.

After all, self-encouragement should definitely be a part of your weight loss plans. Otherwise, you will just fail in the end.

6. Use measurable measures

Saying that you are going to be more positive this week or that you are going to really get serious this week is not a goal that you can measure and should not be a part of your weight loss plan.

This is another reason why you should incorporate exercise on your weight loss plan and focus on it. You should be able to count up the minutes of exercise in order to be successful in your plan.

The bottom line is, people should make-weight loss plans that will only remain as it is, just a plan. They have to put it into action by incorporating goals that will motivate them to succeed.                                                                                                                                                                     BMI, Body mass index, diet, Dieting, dieting programs, Eating, Fitness, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, National Institutes of Health, Nutrition, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Shopping, Top Weight loss, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

7 Simple Tricks to Prevent Overeating


7 Simple Tricks to Prevent Overeating                                                                                                                                                                        Well I found this on Shine from Yahoo, If you’re still struggling with Portion Control. These 7 simple Tricks can help If you stay consistent and make them a part of your life style.Over time you will start to eat less, stay active and watch those unwanted pounds disappear.                                                                                                                                                                                             A couple of extra bites at dinner. A second cookie nibbled with your afternoon tea.     In the grand scheme of overeating, these tidbits don’t seem like much.
But consider this: “If you consume 100 calories more than you burn every day, you’ll gain 10 pounds by the end of a year,” says Gail Altschuler, M.D., medical director of the Altschuler Clinic, a center for weight loss and wellness in Novato, California.
Sounds demoralizing. But now take that fact and turn it around: 100 calories isn’t a lot of food, after all — and you can use that to your advantage. “You don’t have to make enormous changes to see benefits and get results,” says Altschuler.
With that point in mind, we combed the research to find surprisingly simple ways to eat a little less. “Stack a few of these tips together,” Altschuler says, “and you could really see an impact.”
                                                                                                                                                                  1. Take a Seat Whenever you eat, sit at a table and use cutlery and a plate, rather than eat on the run, standing up, or at your desk. That way, the next time you eat you’ll chow about 30 percent less, according to a recent study.
The study’s author, Patricia Pliner, Ph.D., psychology researcher and professor at the University of Toronto at Mississauga, thinks this occurs because of the way we’ve been trained to perceive and respond to mealtime. Treating food like a meal, even if it’s a snack, tells your brain that you don’t need to eat for a while.
Hana Feeney, R.D., nutritionist at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, Arizona, adds that “if you make a rule not to eat without sitting and using a plate, you’ll eliminate a lot of the mindless calories consumed by picking.”
Plus: The Rules of Snacking                                                                                                                                                                         2. Sip Some Soup Before digging into your entrée, savor a bowl of soup. You’ll likely consume 20 percent fewer calories over the course of the meal (a good tip to remember if you tend to overeat at restaurants).The soup fills and stretches your stomach, “sending signals to your brain that tell you to stop or slow down eating,” Feeney says. To maximize nutrition and minimize calories, choose a vegetable or broth-based soup, such as gazpacho, and skip the cream-based selections.
                                                                                                                                                                    3. Think Simple Variety may be the spice of life, but it can ruin the best intentions when it comes to eating. We consume more calories when we see an array of food, say researchers. To understand how this works, scientists gave subjects m&ms and found that the more colors they mixed in a bowl, the more people ate.
Keep this tip in mind when planning a meal and don’t go overboard with the offerings — if you’re serving rice, for instance, pass on the bread and potatoes. As for buffets, why torture yourself? Steer clear.
Plus: Recipes to Jump-Start Weight Loss
                                                                                                                                                                      4. Downsize Bigger is not always better. Oversize dishes and spoons cause you to overeat — even if you think you’re a good judge of portions. Case in point: Nutrition experts who were given big bowls at an ice cream party devoured 31 percent more than those with smaller bowls.
Ditto on the serving spoons: Those helping themselves with bigger utensils downed 14.5 percent more ice cream than folks with smaller serving spoons (irrespective of bowl size).
“When there’s empty space on the plate, a panic sets in that you’re not going to have enough to eat,” Feeney says — thus the tendency to load up your dish. Cut calories by using salad plates or Grandma’s china (antique plates are typically smaller). And downsize those serving utensils, too.
                                                                                                                                                                  5. Hide It It’s true: When we see food, we eat it. A study of secretaries found that those with chocolate candies in clear containers on their desks ate almost twice as much as they did than when the candies were “hidden” in opaque containers. They also ate less if the candy was placed at least six feet away from their desks. The moral? Don’t mess with temptation. Keep calorie-dense treats covered, tucked away in a cabinet, or out of reach.
When you really want a snack of, say, a cookie, go for broke rather than opt for the low-fat version of the treat. In one study, people who ate snack foods that boasted a reduced fat content consumed as much as 50 percent more calories than when they ate regular versions of the same foods.It appears that those labels function like permission slips, giving us the okay to eat our fill. “Foods low in calories or fat, or low in sugar or carbs, tend to reduce our inhibition,” Feeney says.
                                                                                                                                                                   6. Sniff a Whiff Apparently, peppermint’s powers go beyond freshening your breath. A small study at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia found that people who inhaled peppermint essential oil every two hours ate 23 percent fewer calories during a five-day period.When you’re struck with the urge to visit the vending machine, put this finding to work for you by keeping a small vial of the oil handy; you can also try popping a mint or sipping a strong cup of peppermint tea.
                                                                                                                                                                   7. Be Sneaky Sometimes, perception means more than reality. You can trick yourself into thinking you have more food by serving choices that spread out — like roasted, cubed potatoes or pasta shells with sauce — instead of dense foods, like mashed potatoes or lasagna.
The spread-out dishes look like more but cost less, calorie-wise. Craving chocolate with your fruit? Skip the bar and shave a small piece onto a bowlful. It looks like a bigger portion, so you’re more likely to feel satisfied.                                                                                                                                              Calorie, Canyon Ranch, diet, Dieting, Eating, Fitness, Food, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, Nutrition, Overeating, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Portion control (dieting), Serving size, Snack, Soup, Top Weight loss, Weight, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

15 Hidden Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight


 Reblogged:from Shine                                                                                                               15 Hidden Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight

   
Scale not moving? Avoid these common roadblocks to weight loss
Reason #1: You Don’t Realize That Sugar Lurks Everywhere
Many foods that we don’t think of as sweet, like pasta, soups, cereal, salad dressings and sauces, contain sugar and often it goes by another name like agave nectar, high-fructose corn syrup, evaporated cane juice, fruit juice concentrate(s), glucose, dextrose, sucrose, honey, malt syrup or molasses — just to name a few!. If your diet is high in sugar you may be missing out on important nutrients and overeating more often than you realize since sugar stimulates taste. A high-sugar diet can also cause a rapid rise and fall in blood sugar, which can zap your energy and make you feel hungry again.
Solution: Read nutrition labels and steer clear of cereals and sauces that have more than 8 grams of sugar per serving. If you need a sweet fix, choose fresh fruit as often as possible. Skip sodas in favor of water (plain or flavored with a bit of lemon, lime or juice essence) and unsweetened teas.
Reason #2: You Choose “Healthy” Processed Food Foods labeled “low sugar,” “low sodium,” “multi grain,” “organic,” “natural,” “vitamin-enriched,” “high fiber,” or “sweetened with honey or agave” may be high in calories or hidden sweeteners or unhealthy additives. And if you assume it’s healthy, you may eat more of it.
Solution: Switch to whole foods like fresh produce, fish and meat and beans and legumes and limit consumption of processed foods.Reason
#3: You Snack On Nutrition Bars How often do you eat a nutrition bar as a snack rather than to fuel a workout? If it’s often, you could be downing 400 or more calories without realizing it. Although touted as healthy, many nutrition bars are no better than a candy bar. If you use them for fuel, choose carb-loaded bars for aerobic exercise and protein bars for weight training. If you eat them in the normal course of your day, choose 100-calorie bars for a snack and 350-calorie bars for a meal (and don’t combine with them other high-calorie foods) and avoid bars with trans fats.
Solution: Eat whole food snacks, like sliced apple and peanut butter, and reserve bars for emergencies.
Reason #4: You Exercise Too Leisurely
If you rely on the calorie counts on machines or the numbers of calories you’ll burn promised to you by instructors you could be exerting too little effort to jumpstart weight loss. To burn 100 calories an hour, you need to maintain a high level of aerobic activity the entire hour.
Solution: Determine your target heart rate for optimal exercise then check your pulse several times during workouts (or wear a heart-rate monitor) to make sure you’re consistently in that calorie-burning zone. Try interval training (a mix of fast and slow pace), fun classes (Zumba anyone?) or outdoor exercise to keep you engaged and burning calories at maximal capacity. Choose exercises that offer a challenge or cross train on different equipment to push your body out of weight-loss plateaus.
Reason #5: You Ignore Fiber
Fiber-rich foods are good for weight-loss in two ways: They require more calorie-burning effort during digestion and they are filling and satisfying, which helps curb cravings.
Solution: Aim for 30 grams of fiber a day. Good sources include fruits, vegetables, unprocessed whole grains, beans and legumes and unprocessed nuts.
Click here for 10 more hidden reasons you’re not losing weight              

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Lose Weight With”Sensa”


Sensa is an all natural weight loss system that helps you to feel full faster so that you will eat less and lose weight.This is because the urge to eat is regulated by a specific portion of the brain called the satiety center.And as you eat, smell and taste receptors send messages to the brain, which releases hormones that trigger your body’s “feel full” signal.So by enhancing the perception of smell and taste, Sensa Tastants speed up the process of sensory-specific satiety so you are less inclined to overeat.If your struggling  with weight loss give Sensa a try.       How Sensa Works:                                                                                                                              The Scents from the Sensa Tastants travel through the nose and tongue to nerve receptors. The receptors then send signals that stimulate the olfactory bulb and the taste center in the brain.The olfactory bulb signals the satiety center in the hypothalamus which sends signals to the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland releases hormones that suppress hunger and appetite.                                                                                                                                      Sensa merely helps you eat less of the foods you love and gain greater satisfaction from smaller portions. The Sensa shaker contains “salty” and “sweet” Tastants. You just sprinkle the sweet Tastants on all sweet foods and the salty Tastants on everything else. If you are unsure if a food is sweet or salty, then use the sweet Tastants. Before you know it, your body is craving less and you’re losing weight.

Although the Tastants are labled as salty and sweet, they are used only as guidelines for the types of food they should be sprinkled on. Tastants do not make food taste salty or sweet in fact, they don’t change the taste of food at all. Also, salty Tastants contain less than 1 mg of sodium, and sweet Tastants contain NO sugar.Each Sensa Starter Kit comes with Sensa Tastants,User Guide,Tracking Log,and a How-To DVD Sensa is Clinically proven. with an  Average weight loss of 30.5 lbs in 6 months.                                                                              Body weight, Diet food, Food, Health, Loss Weight, Odor, Olfactory bulb, Portion Control, Portion control (dieting), Programs, Sensa, Tastant, Top Weight loss, weight loss, weight loss programs