It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss


Reblogged:from Huffington Post                                                                                                                               It’s Too Darn Hot: How Heat Affects Your Weight Loss                                                                                                                                                                                                                   The heat waves streaking across the country bring up questions in people’s minds about whether they should change their eating and drinking habits in such conditions.

Do our calorie needs change, or does our metabolism increase during the hot summer temps? Well, maybe yes, but probably no. Our bodies are well-tuned to keep things at status quo. If anything, our metabolism may go up when we’re cold, as our bodies need to work harder to maintain our temperature (by shivering). In the heat, our bodies actually slow down a bit to try to conserve energy so as not to overheat. But none of this really makes any significant change in our BMR or how many calories our body needs.

What is important to note is that in hot weather your body is prone to dehydration, and this actually can have an effect on your metabolism. In the course of an average day, sweating, breathing, and waste elimination together leach more than 10 cups of water out of your body — and that’s without exercise. If you don’t replace what you’ve lost, you may become dehydrated; your system literally begins to dry out.

Some people say that their appetite decreases when it’s hot outside. If that’s the case, you should still try to eat small, frequent healthy meals throughout the day. Many people find cool gazpacho refreshing in hotter weather. Try my easy recipe for Icy Gazpacho With Fresh Lime.

The takeaway here: When it’s hot outside, drink plenty of water, and don’t skip your workout! When it’s super hot outside, try not to exercise during the hottest part of the day, especially if you’re exercising outdoors. Early morning and evenings are your best bet. To make sure your body doesn’t overheat, monitor your heart rate. Some people invest in a simple heart rate monitor. It’s also important to don the appropriate workout attire. Don’t wear sweats or heavy clothes while working out when it’s hot. Sweating more doesn’t help you burn more calories; it just may dehydrate you more. And most important, as I mentioned, stay hydrated!

We’re mostly made of water — on average, it comprises around 60 percent of the human body. Specific components of our bodies are even more watery: muscle tissue is 75 percent water, while blood is 70 percent water. Water aids in the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat, and it helps eliminate waste from the body.

Dehydration lowers your body’s energy levels. Because blood is mostly water, when you’re dehydrated the volume of your blood diminishes, lowering amounts of oxygen and nutrients that reach your tissues. Recent studies show there’s a trickle-down effect on metabolism: Dehydration can slow your system to such an extent that you burn fewer calories than you would otherwise during the course of the day. And dehydration can cause other undesirable symptoms, including headache, dizziness, muscle weakness, and a dry, sticky mouth.

If those negative side effects aren’t enough to send you to the faucet to fill a glass, consider that drinking ample water can help maintain a healthy weight. The volume of a glass of water in your belly can make you feel full, and water dilutes sodium levels in your body, combating fluid retention. And if you try drinking a glass of water whenever you feel the urge to snack, you may discover the cause was thirst, not hunger — thereby staving off nibbling.

To stay well-hydrated, follow these guidelines:

  • Aim for eight to 12 glasses a day. Keep a large glass on your desk to track your daily intake. When I’m working at home, I fill a half-gallon pitcher of water each morning to drink throughout my workday. Some days I drink more!
  • Hydrate more when working out. Consume six to eight ounces of water every 20 minutes when exercising, and then have two eight-ounce glasses afterwards to restore fluids. If you plan to exercise for more than an hour, plan for it in advance — up water intake before you work out, hydrate well during exercise, and then chug plenty of fluids after the event.
  • Avoid drinking your calories. Sodas and fruit juices may quench your thirst, but they’re loaded with sugar. Similarly, sports drinks can pack a calorie punch. Unless you exercise for more than an hour, you can replenish your fluids and nutrients using water and healthy post-workout snacks instead.
  • Watch out for drinks that dehydrate. Sound like an oxymoron? Caffeinated soda, tea, coffee and alcohol all have a diuretic effect, causing fluid loss. If you drink coffee or a cocktail, follow-up with an extra water chaser to stay in balance.

If you have a tough time downing enough water, try these strategies:

  • If you dislike the lack of flavor, add herbs like mint or basil, or slices of citrus fruits or cucumber to a pitcher of water. Your next glass will be infused with refreshing taste.
  • Try tea — hot or iced. It’s calorie-free and flavorful. Green tea is another option; its caffeine is surrounded by tannic acid compounds that slow its release into the bloodstream, minimizing its dehydrating effects. Green tea is also a good source of the antioxidant EGCG, which has a mild metabolism-boosting effect. Four cups of green tea per day can kick up your metabolism by 80 calories. Its rich antioxidant reserves are also thought to help combat diseases from Alzheimer’s to cancer.
  • If you routinely turn to other beverages once the day is underway, drink a couple of glasses of water right away when you wake up. You’ll make up for fluids lost overnight and be well on your way to a hydrated day.

The recipe below is for a refreshing drink that’s perfect for spring. Make a jug to keep in your fridge, and you’re guaranteed to quaff healthily all day long!

Zinger Green Tea

Packed with antioxidants, this tea is bursting with flavor, too. Fresh lime juice gives it a tangy zing and a wallop of vitamin C. Makes six servings or 1.5 quarts.

Ingredients

6 cups water 1 cup firmly packed fresh mint leaves 3 green tea bags 1.3 cups agave nectar 1.3 cups fresh lime juice 6 lime slices, for garnish

Instructions:

Bring the water to boil in a three-quart saucepan. Add the mint and tea bags, remove from the heat, and let steep for five minutes. Strain. Stir in the agave and lime juice. Serve hot or iced, garnished with the lime slices.

Mint Factoid: The mint family includes basil, marjoram, oregano, thyme, and rosemary, among others. All are excellent sources of antioxidants. Their leaves have glands containing essential oils, which provide their distinctive flavors.

Nutrient Analysis Per Serving: 43 calories, 0 g protein, 12 g carbohydrates, 0 g total fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 g monounsaturated fat, 30 mg omega-3, 2 g fiber, 1 g sugar, 13 mg sodium

So how will you take advantage of the summer heat and make it work for you?

Eat Oatmeal to Power Your Morning Workout


 Reblogged: from Shine on Yahoo                                                                                                                             Eat Oatmeal to Power Your Morning Workout.                                                                                                                                      If your morning workout routine includes a workout for your abs but you are not seeing any results, the problem might be related to what you’re eating. Your body‘s overall metabolism needs to be working top-notch to really have all that exercise pay off. The foods you eat can play a huge role in how well your metabolism works. Eating oatmeal may be the secret to powering your workout and boosting your metabolism.
Two years ago I started working out and having a more active lifestyle. In the first year I lost almost 20 pounds. However, the last 10 pounds were the hardest to drop. After a lot of research I realized that by giving my body some better fuel in the morning and adding a little bit of cardio, I could set it up for a full day of calorie burning. The best fuel in the morning is a mix of whole grains, fruit, and dairy. However, if you are like me, healthy eating can get boring. So, I discovered healthy eating recipes on the Quaker website .
My favorite oatmeal breakfast has been the peanut butter and jelly oatmeal bowl. Here is my healthy eating recipe that will satisfy a sweet tooth, power your morning workout, and rev up your metabolism:
                                                                                                                                                                       Ingredients: 1/2 cup 100% whole oats OR one package instant oats 1/2 cup of water 1/2 cup of almond milk (can use skim milk as well) 1 container of Dole single-serve sliced frozen strawberries (or about a 1/4 cup of fresh sliced strawberries) 1 TBS of creamy peanut butter
                                                                                                                                                                      Directions: Put the oats, milk, and water into a microwave-safe bowl and mix together. Place the frozen strawberries on top. Microwave the mixture for 1 1/2 minutes. Remove from the microwave and top with the peanut butter.
There are mixed reviews on whether you should eat before or after a workout. It is definitely not a good idea to work out on an empty stomach, but eating too much can make you feel sick while you are working out. Oatmeal, yogurt, and apples are all on the top ten list of metabolism boosting foods; eating them all together means your body will burn calories much better throughout the day.
By finding healthy eating recipes that combine metabolism boosting foods into one meal, you can help your metabolism work better and lose weight faster with less exercising.

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Managing You’r Metabolism


What I'm Reading: Master Your Metabolism By Ji...
What I’m Reading: Master Your Metabolism By Jillian Michaels (Photo credit: puck90)

Many people like to blame their weight on their metabolism, Which is the rate at which the body burns calories. Diet and exercise will increase your metabolic rate,doing so will contribute to weight loss. But maintaining a lower weight will be an ongoing struggle because your metabolism doesn’t remain boosted without constant effort. whatever lifestyle changes you made to lose weight, you will have to continue in order to keep it off, People who are able to keep the weight off in general have to reinvent themselves. Your metabolism is built to resist rapid weight loss, which meant that if food ran out, your body could switch to survival mode by lowering metabolism. Boosting your metabolism through diet and exercise will provide quick weight-loss in the beginning, but as you lose weight your metabolism will actually begin to slow down.When you attempt to maintain or lose weight, your body is fighting back. It’s burning calories more efficiently, even more so when you exercise or do other activities like walking around.This is one of the reasons why people have great success in losing weight up to a certain point, but then suddenly stop seeing results. Their metabolism has slowed to match their new level of fitness; there is less body mass to fuel, so the metabolism doesn’t have to work as hard.Here’s a few ways you can overcome your metabolism lose weight, and keep it off.

 You need to eat even less as you lose weight because your body needs fewer calories to sustain itself. Or you could increase the intensity and duration of your workouts. Either strategy can help break a fitness plateau.                                                                                                                                                              Try different types of exercise to work new muscles Strength training is known to help keep your metabolism high, because muscle burns more calories at rest than fat does.

Complex carbohydrates should make up at least 50 percent of your daily diet, to  keep your body properly fueled.You can eat fewer carbohydrates and more lean protein for a few days the change could bump you off your plateau.Since it takes more calories for the body to convert protein into fuel than carbohydrates or fats.

Maintaining weight loss will be a long-term struggle.Over 75 percent of  the people struggling to lose weight will return to their previous levels of body weight within a few years. This is the result of combined metabolic, behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic nervous system changes that  favor the regain of lost weigh.This is why it is necessary to make long-term lifestyle changes to sustain weight loss.If your interested in a copy of the book  here’s a link http://astore.amazon.com/pr0216-20

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