Can Vegetarians Go Paleo?


Can Vegetarians Go Paleo?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Reblogged: from Huffington Post                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Bacon, steak and more bacon is often associated with the much-hypedPaleo Diet, which is undoubtedly having a moment. Can vegetarians take part in a diet that puts so much emphasis on meat?

It is possible. Our Paleolithic ancestors were very much about meat, yes, but vegetables, nuts and seeds were also part of their whatever-we-can-get-our-hands-on meal plan. The basic premise of this stone-age eating is to eat like hunter-gatherers did 10,000 years ago. They didn’t have farms, which made it impossible to eat wheat or dairy. Proponents of the lifestyle argue humans were genetically predisposed to consume food the way our ancestors did, and that mimicking those ancient eating habits can help decrease chronic disease and support a healthy weight.

The millennial version gets specific: You can eat meat, poultry, fish, eggs, fruit, vegetables and nuts. Nixed from the list? Grains, legumes, dairy, refined sugar and vegetable oils.

It’s not surprising that vegetarians are among those eager to give Paleo a go; it was the most Googled diet of 2013 and hasn’t lost much traction. For some, it may be impossible to imagine quitting staples like pizza, sandwiches and ice cream, but thousands have tried. There are hundreds of books and blogs on the lifestyle along with millions offood porn-esque hashtags.

Whether vegetarians should go Paleo is a more complicated story.

For starters, herbivores who want to go Paleo will have to rely on eggs for their main source of protein. Beyond the health risks associated with overdosing on eggs, eating them for every meal could get a little tiresome.

“The most quality sources of protein for vegetarians are prohibited on the Paleo diet,” Alexis Joseph, a registered dietician and the author ofHummusapien blog, told The Huffington Post. No peanuts (they’re legumes). No dairy. No soy. No quinoa. All of these “nos” can make it really tough to get the body the nutrients it needs. Nuts, which are permitted on the Paleo plan, are problematic. “They’re a really good protein, but they’re extremely high in calories,” Joseph says.

Joseph is also skeptical of the entire diet. “We can’t mimic cavemen. They had to hunt and gather for their food — which was physically taxing. Their meat wasn’t factory-farmed and saturated with antibiotics, pesticides and chemicals.” Plus, she says, many of the animals hunted by our cave-dwelling ancestors are now extinct. Paleo diets often emphasize a meal plan low in carbohydrates, but the body and the brain run on carbs, Joseph says. “Low carbohydrate, high protein diets can be dangerous for the body. Eliminating legumes and whole grains reduces fiber and nutrients like B vitamins, which are proven to promote healthy weight, reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and lower blood pressure.”

For those vegetarians who are determined to dip their toes into the Paleo fad pool, Joseph suggests making a few modifications to the diet. Incorporate quality vegetarian sources of proteins like lentils, quinoa and beans. The changes will make the diet resemble more of a gluten-free vegetarian meal plan but still promote the essential qualities of the Paleo diet, which can support certain healthy habits, like eating fewer processed foods and hydrogenated oils.

If you’re curious what an entirely Paleo and vegetarian dish might look like, Joseph does have one recipe to share:Joseph says this recipe boasts the good stuff: The sweet potato is made up of complex carbs and beta-carotene, the egg provides some protein and the avocado cubes are full of healthy fat. To make it, scrub a medium sweet potato, stab it with a fork and bake it in the oven at 400 degrees for about an hour. Once it’s cooked, take it out and slice it in half and fill it with cubed avocado and salsa. Cook up your egg however you like (consider prepping it sunny-side up in a bit of coconut oil) and add it to the stuffed potato.

Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes


Sorry I haven’t posted much lately,I been pretty busy so I thought I would give you all a little treat here is one of the many Ebooks I was given recently. I thought you all might like to check it out feel free to download a copy for yourself as my gift to you. I have a lot going on right now but I will try to post again soon. To get to this e-book just click the link below, after  you click on the link it will come up again so you will have to click the link again and it will bring up the Ebook. I just tried it myself to make sure it was working hope you enjoy these yummy treats.                                                                                                                                                              Lighten Up 20 Tasty Healthy Recipes for the New Year from Mr Food

 

Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo


Reblogged: from The Daily Meal                                                                                                                             Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo 

For authenticity, Eric recommends using Cajun andouille, a pork-based sausage that is fatty and heavily smoked but not heavily spiced. La Place, has declared itself the andouille capital, hosting an annual festival every October, but when Eric returns to his family’s home in Los Angeles to host their annual gumbo gathering, he frequents Pete’s Louisiana Style Hot Links in Crenshaw. Says Eric, “We have to buy extra to make sure that there is enough left after everybody snacks on them.” If none are available, any smoked pork sausage will work.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 whole chicken
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 8 ounces andouille sausage
  • 1 smoked ham hock
  • 1 gallon chicken stock
  • tablespoon leftover cooking fat, such as chicken fat or bacon grease
  • 4 ribs celery, coarsely chopped
  • 2 large yellow onions, coarsely chopped
  • 1 small green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large red bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 1 small poblano pepper, seeded and coarsely chopped
  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons smoked hot paprika
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons dried basil
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 2 teaspoons dried ground sage
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 1 cup canola oil
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound small Maine red shrimp (in season) or other small fresh shrimp, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon filé powder
  • 2 tablespoons minced parsley
  • 1 tablespoon minced oregano
  • 2 tablespoons minced sage
  • Cooked white rice
  • 4 thinly sliced scallions (optional)

    DIRECTIONS

    Preheat the oven to 450 degrees.

    Season the chicken liberally both outside and inside the cavity with salt and pepper. Tuck the wings underneath the bird (twist at the joint) and tie the drumsticks together with string or twist ties. Place it breast-side up in a roasting pan. Roast to an internal temperature of 165 degrees, 45-55 minutes, or until the skin turns deep golden brown and juices from the center of the bird run clear into the pan when you tip them out.

    Remove from the oven and rest for 25 minutes, until the chicken is cool enough to handle.

    Meanwhile, lower the oven to 350 degrees. Roast the andouille in a small roasting pan until fully cooked, about 20 minutes. Remove from the pan and set aside to cool, then slice into bite-sized pieces and set aside. (Grace saves the sausage fat left behind in the roasting pan to use for sautéing the trinity later on in the recipe.) Return to the rested chicken and remove and discard the skin. Pull the meat from the carcass, chop into bite-sized pieces, and set aside. Return the bones back to the pan and roast in the oven until bones are deeply browned, about 25 minutes. This step is optional but adds depth of flavor to the finished stock.

    Transfer the roasted bones to a large pot. Add about ¼ cup water to the drippings in the hot roasting pan and scrape up the browned bits clinging to the bottom. Pour the resulting liquid into the pot. Add the ham hock and chicken stock. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium-low and gently simmer for 1 hour, skimming away fat and impurities that rise to the surface.

    Strain the resulting stock through a fine-mesh sieve, reserving the liquid and the ham hock separately. Rinse the pot of any residue and return the stock to it. Discard the chicken bones.

    Once the ham hock is cool enough to handle, pick off the meat, chop into bite-size pieces, and set aside.

    In a large skillet over high heat, melt the fat. Add ½ the trinity (onions, celery, and peppers) reserving the rest for later. Reduce the heat to medium-high and sauté for 5 minutes, until the vegetables soften slightly. Add the garlic and continue to cook until the vegetables are tender, about 5 more minutes. Add the vegetables to the stock along with the paprika, dried herbs, cayenne, and bay leaves. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat. Simmer briskly for about 1 hour, until the liquid is reduced by ¼, then season with salt and pepper.

    To make the roux, pour the canola oil into a large skillet, preferably cast iron, and whisk in the flour to create a wet paste. Cook over medium heat, whisking often and employing patience, until the roux darkens past the “peanut butter” stage, taking on a deep, dark chocolate color and a rich, nutty aroma, about 30 minutes. Turn off the heat and carefully add the remaining chopped trinity vegetables to the roux, continuing to stir constantly until the vegetables stop spitting, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the roux to a large mixing bowl and cool for 15 minutes. Slowly whisk 2 cups of hot stock into the roux to thin the consistency.

    Now it’s time to pull the gumbo together! Pour the thinned roux back into the pot of hot stock (now properly reduced), whisking vigorously to incorporate it. Add the reserved chicken, ham hock, and sausage along with the shrimp, filé, and fresh herbs. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat. Simmer until the gumbo has thickened and the shrimp are cooked, about 25 minutes. The final consistency should be somewhere between a soup and a stew, or as one cook describes, “muddy.” If it is too thin, reduce the liquid until it reaches the desired consistency. Too thick? Add water or stock. When finished, season with salt and pepper.

    To serve: Spoon gumbo into large, flat bowls, then spoon a liberal mound of rice in the center. Scallions are the authors’ addition for color and texture; good Creoles or Cajuns would eat their bowls neat. Leftover gumbo tastes better the next day — even better the day after that — and can be saved for up to a week in the refrigerator.For more great Recipes visit http://www.thedailymeal.com/

Fabio’s Pasta and Bean Soup


Reblogged:from Shine                                                                                                                                         Fabio’s Pasta and Bean Soup                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Nothing is better for families on a budget than the classic Pasta E Fagioli, Fabio’s super simple and delicious one pot soup with pasta and beans. It’s so flavorful, you’ll forget that it’s VEGETARIAN!

Tips:

  • Beans 101- High in protein and virtually fat-free, these delicious pods are versatile and packed with nutrients. The secret to cooking dry beans without soaking them overnight? Choose smaller beans.
  • Find the Perfect Pasta for Your soups, Soup is a great place to use up spare pasta: break up large noodles, or just add small shapes. Don’t add it until the last few minutes of cooking, and keep pasta on the side when storing soup for later use.
  • Cast-Iron CookwareThe Perfect Soup Pot. Cast-iron is able to maintain and withstand very high temperatures, so pots and pans are able to go from stove top to oven with no hassle. Their heavy weight distributes heat evenly, ensuring perfectly cooked dishes.

 

Ingredients:

3 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

2 carrots, diced

1 onion, diced

2 celery stalks with leaves, diced

1 fennel bulb

3 bay leaves, dried

6 sprigs thyme

¾ lb. Borlotti beans

pinch sea salt

4 garlic cloves – grated

2-3 quarts chicken or vegetable stock

28 oz. can diced tomatoes

pinch sea salt

pinch fresh ground black pepper

extra virgin olive oil for drizzling

2 cups small shaped pasta

20 fresh basil leaves

 

Method:

Heat a large cast-iron pot over medium heat. Add extra virgin olive oil.   Add carrots, onions, and celery and stir. Meanwhile, dice fennel. Add to pot and stir.Strip the thyme sprigs over the pot and discard sticks. Add bay leaf. Sauté about ten minutes, or until the vegetables caramelize and start to soften. Add Borlotti beans and grated garlic; stir.Add stock, canned tomatoes, a pinch of sea salt and black pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. Stir, cover, and boil for one hour, or until beans are soft. Add pasta and cook for five minutes. If you don’t plan on serving the soup all at once, cook the pasta separately, and add to each bowl as you serve it. Otherwise, the pasta will soak up too much broth when stored. Chop basil and add to pot. Stir thoroughly, and remove from heat. Remove bay leaves and serve immediately

8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label


   Reblogged:from Yahoo Health                                                                                                                                                                                               8 Ingredients You Never Want to See on Your Nutrition Label          

The year was 1950, and The Magic 8-Ball had just arrived in stores. It looked like a toy, but it wasn’t. It was a future-telling device, powered by the unknown superpowers that lived inside its cheap plastic shell. Despite a bit of an attitude—”Don’t count on it,” “My reply is no”—it was a huge success. Americans, apparently, want to see their futures.

A few decades later, Congress passed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act that, among other things, turned the 45,000 food products in the average supermarket into fortune-telling devices. Americans inexplicably yawned. I’m trying to change that. Why? The nutrition label can predict the future size of your pants and health care bills.

Unfortunately, these labels aren’t as clear and direct as the Magic 8-Ball. Consider the list of ingredients: The Food and Drug Administration has approved more than 3,000 additives, most of which you’ve never heard of. But the truth is, you don’t have to know them all. You just need to be able to parse out the bad stuff. Do that and you’ll have a pretty good idea how your future will shape up—whether you’ll end up overweight and unhealthy or turn out to be fit, happy, and energized.

While researching the new Eat This, Not That! 2013: The No-Diet Weight Loss Solution, I identified 8 ingredients you never want to see on the nutrition label. Should you put down products that contain them? As the Magic 8-Ball would say: Signs point to yes.

BHA

This preservative is used to prevent rancidity in foods that contain oils. Unfortunately, BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) has been shown to cause cancer in rats, mice, and hamsters. The reason the FDA hasn’t banned it is largely technical—the cancers all occurred in the rodents’ forestomachs, an organ that humans don’t have. Nevertheless, the study, published in the Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, concluded that BHA was “reasonably anticipated to be a carcinogen,” and as far as I’m concerned, that’s reason enough to eliminate it from your diet.

You’ll find it in: Fruity Pebbles, Cocoa Pebbles

Parabens

These synthetic preservatives are used to inhibit mold and yeast in food. The problem is parabens may also disrupt your body’s hormonal balance. A study in Food Chemical Toxicology found that daily ingestion decreased sperm and testosterone production in rats, and parabens have been found present in breast cancer tissues.

You’ll find it in: Baskin-Robbins sundaes

Partially Hydrogenated Oil

I’ve harped on this before, but it bears repeating: Don’t confuse “0 g trans fat” with being trans fat-free. The FDA allows products to claim zero grams of trans fat as long as they have less than half a gram per serving. That means they can have 0.49 grams per serving and still be labeled a no-trans-fat food. Considering that two grams is the absolute most you ought to consume in a day, those fractions can quickly add up. The telltale sign that your snack is soiled with the stuff? Look for partially hydrogenated oil on the ingredient statement. If it’s anywhere on there, then you’re ingesting artery-clogging trans fat.

You’ll find it in: Long John Silver’s Popcorn Shrimp, Celeste frozen pizzas

FIGHT FAT WITH FAT! Some fats, like trans fat, will pad you with extra pounds, but other types can help you shed unwanted weight. See for yourself—pick up these 5 Fatty Foods that Make You Skinny today!

Sodium Nitrite

Nitrites and nitrates are used to inhibit botulism-causing bacteria and to maintain processed meats’ pink hues, which is why the FDA allows their use. Unfortunately, once ingested, nitrite can fuse with amino acids (of which meat is a prime source) to form nitrosamines, powerful carcinogenic compounds. Ascorbic and erythorbic acids—essentially vitamin C—have been shown to decrease the risk, and most manufacturers now add one or both to their products, which has helped. Still, the best way to reduce risk is to limit your intake.

You’ll find it in: Oscar Mayer hot dogs, Hormel bacon

Caramel Coloring

This additive wouldn’t be dangerous if you made it the old-fashioned way—with water and sugar, on top of a stove. But the food industry follows a different recipe: They treat sugar with ammonia, which can produce some nasty carcinogens. How carcinogenic are these compounds? A Center for Science in the Public Interest report asserted that the high levels of caramel color found in soda account for roughly 15,000 cancers in the U.S. annually. Another good reason to scrap soft drinks? They’re among The 20 Worst Drinks in America.

You’ll find it in: Coke/Diet Coke, Pepsi/Diet Pepsi

Castoreum

Castoreum is one of the many nebulous “natural ingredients” used to flavor food. Though it isn’t harmful, it is unsettling. Castoreum is a substance made from beavers’ castor sacs, or anal scent glands. These glands produce potent secretions that help the animals mark their territory in the wild. In the food industry, however, 1,000 pounds of the unsavory ingredient are used annually to imbue foods—usually vanilla or raspberry flavored—with a distinctive, musky flavor.

You’ll find it in: Potentially any food containing “natural ingredients”

Food Dyes

Plenty of fruit-flavored candies and sugary cereals don’t contain a single gram of produce, but instead rely on artificial dyes and flavorings to suggest a relationship with nature. Not only do these dyes allow manufacturers to mask the drab colors of heavily processed foods, but certain hues have been linked to more serious ailments. A Journal of Pediatrics study linked Yellow 5 to hyperactivity in children, Canadian researchers found Yellow 6 and Red 40 to be contaminated with known carcinogens, and Red 3 is known to cause tumors. The bottom line? Avoid artificial dyes as much as possible.

You’ll find it in: Lucky Charms, Skittles, Jell-O

THE DOMINO EFFECT: Sugar doesn’t just come in the form of cookies and candy. Discover the insidious ways it can creep into your diet with 9 Sneaky Sources of Sugar.

Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein

Hydrolyzed vegetable protein, used as a flavor enhancer, is plant protein that has been chemically broken down into amino acids. One of these acids, glutamic acid, can release free glutamate. When this glutamate joins with free sodium in your body, they form monosodium glutamate (MSG), an additive known to cause adverse reactions—headaches, nausea, and weakness, among others—in sensitive individuals. When MSG is added to products directly, the FDA requires manufacturers to disclose its inclusion on the ingredient statement. But when it occurs as a byproduct of hydrolyzed protein, the FDA allows it to go unrecognized

  

Baked Stuffed Peppers


Reblogged:from Mr.Food                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Baked Stuffed Peppers                                                                                                                                                                                                    Our over-stuffed veggie Baked Stuffed Peppers are a  super change-of-pace easy side dish.Colorful red and green bell peppers serve as tasty edible bowls for a stuffing that teams with any main  dish.                                                                                                                                                                                              Cooking Time:25  minBaked Stuffed Peppers

Ingredients

  • 1/4   cup olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 ripe tomato, finely chopped
  • 1/4   cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 3/4   cup Italian bread crumbs
  • 1/4   teaspoon salt
  • 1/4   teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 red or green bell peppers, split lengthwise and cleaned (see  Options)
  • 1 tablespoon grated or shredded Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Coat an 8-inch square baking dish with  cooking spray.
  2. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and garlic, and  saute just until softened. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients except  pepper halves and Parmesan cheese; mix well.
  3. Fill peppers evenly with mixture and place in prepared baking dish.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.
  4. Add 1/4 cup water to baking dish, cover with foil, and bake 20 minutes.  Remove dish from oven and carefully remove foil; return dish to oven and bake  for an additional 5 to 7 minutes, or until peppers are tender and the filling  is heated through. Serve immediately.

Visit their site at http://www.mrfood.com/  for more great recipes,they also offer free ebooks.

Hudson’s Baked Tilapia


Hudson’s Baked Tilapia                                                                                                                                                                              Ingredients

4 (4 ounce) fillets tilapia

salt and pepper to taste

1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning, or to taste

1 lemon, thinly sliced

1/4 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup sour cream

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease a 9×13 inch baking dish. Season the tilapia fillets with salt, pepper and Cajun seasoning on both sides. Arrange the seasoned fillets in a single layer in the baking dish. Place a layer of lemon slices over the fish fillets. I usually use about 2 slices on each piece so that it covers most of the surface of the fish. Bake uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes in the preheated oven, or until fish flakes easily with a fork. While the fish is baking, mix together the mayonnaise, sour cream, garlic powder, lemon juice and dill in a small bowl. Serve with tilapia

Nutritional Facts (Per Serving)

Servings 4

 

Potato-Horseradish-Crusted Mahi-Mahi                                                                                                                                                                      Ingredients

1 cup precooked shredded potatoes

1 shallot, finely chopped

1 tablespoon prepared horseradish

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1 1/4 pounds mahi-mahi, skin removed, cut into 4 portions

4 teaspoons reduced-fat mayonnaise

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 lemon, quartered

Directions

Combine potatoes, shallot, horseradish, mustard, garlic salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Spread each portion of fish with 1 teaspoon mayonnaise, then top with one-fourth of the potato mixture, pressing the mixture onto the fish.

2. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Carefully place the fish in the pan potato-side down and cook until crispy and browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Gently turn the fish over, reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the fish flakes easily with a fork, 4 to 5 minutes more. Serve with lemon wedges.

Nutritional Facts (Per Serving)

205 calories; 6 g fat (1 g sat, 3 g mono); 105 mg cholesterol; 9 g carbohydrate; 27 g protein; 1 g fiber; 311 mg sodium; 623 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus: Selenium (74% daily value), Potassium (18% dv).

Servings 4

Calories: 284

Total Fat: 18.6g

Cholesterol: 62mg

Sodium: 598mg

Total Carbs: 5.7g

Dietary Fiber: 1.5g

Protein: 24.6g