Water is our Body’s Lifeblood


Water is our Body’s Lifeblood

Yes Water,I felt this post was Important because I think there are a lot of people (self included) that don’t  FIJI Waterrealize how Important It really Is for our health.There are so many of us (self included) again that are hooked on soda,coffee,energy drinks that we almost always choose one of those over a fresh glass of water.I know this because I am one of those people,I can go through a case of Mt Dew in two days with no problem, But just like anything else It’s really hard to stop doing something you are so used to doing, that It has become a habit to reach for the soda first.Now my body Is paying me back for all of those years of  drinking so much soda.So now I see how much my body needs water and I have started cutting back on how much soda,and coffee I drink and I have made It a rule to drink at least 6-glasses of Water a day and I must say I feel so much better I am not as tired,I don’t hurt as much, I can breathe better,and I don’t get as many headaches. SO yes Water is very Important for our body whether you’re trying to loss weight or just want to obtain good health.

The human body can last weeks without food, but only days without water. The body is made up of approximately 55 to 75 per cent water. Water forms the basis of blood, digestive juices, urine and perspiration and is contained in lean muscle, fat and bones.

As the body can’t store water, we need fresh supplies every day to make up for losses from lungs, skin, urine and feces. Water is needed to maintain the health and integrity of every cell in the body, keep the bloodstream liquid enough to flow through blood vessels, help eliminate the bye products of the body’s metabolism, helps to flush out toxins, regulate body temperature through sweating, lubricate and cushion joints and carry nutrients and oxygen to the body’s cells, just to name a few. Drinking refreshing, clean water plays a major role in reducing the risk of certain diseases.

The loss of body water through urination is greatly increased by the ingestion of decaffeinated and alcoholic beverages. These drinks have a diuretic effect, meaning they stimulate the kidneys to excrete more urine. Not only do we lose water, we also lose water-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin C, vitamin B (thiamine) and other B complex vitamins. For every caffeinated or alcoholic beverage you drink, you need to add an
additional glass of pure water.

A diet containing lots of fruits and vegetables will supply about 4 cups of water per day. Even with a diet high in fruits and vegetables, it is still necessary to drink an additional 6 to 8 cups of water per day to supply enough water to meet the body’s daily needs. For every caffeinated or alcoholic beverage you drink, you need to add an additional glass of pure water.

Dehydration occurs when the water content of the body is too low. This is easily fixed by increasing fluid intake. Symptoms of dehydration include headaches, lethargy, mood changes and slow responses, dry nasal passages, dry or cracked lips, dark-colored urine, weakness, tiredness, confusion and hallucinations. Eventually urination stops, the kidneys fail and the body can’t remove toxic waste products. In extreme cases, this may result in death.

Approximately six to eight glasses of a variety of fluids can be consumed each day. More than eight glasses may be needed for physically active people, children, people in hot or humid environments, and breastfeeding women. Less water may be needed for sedentary people, older people, people in a cold environment or people who eat a lot of high water content foods.

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Healthy Diet Essentials


Earth Cuisine for Longevity

Earth Cuisine for Longevity (Photo credit: Barry Gourmet and Raw)

Healthy Diet Essentials                                                                          According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a healthy diet as one that Emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products; includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs, and nuts; and is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars.  But just what minerals and nutrients are vital to our health and well-being?  Consider these nutrient-dense foods when you’re looking to improve your vitamin and mineral intake.Vitamin A is needed for good eyesight and optimal functioning of the immune system.  Cod liver oil, dairy products, sweet potatoes and dark green leafy vegetables are all great natural food sources of vitamin A.Vitamin B1, also known as thiamine, is imperative to the body’s ability to process carbohydrates.  Whole grain breads, cereals and pastas have high amounts of thiamine.

Riboflavin, or B2, can be found in fortified cereals, almonds, asparagus, eggs, and meat.  It’s used in many body processes, including converting food into energy and the production of red blood cells.

Niacin, also known as B3, can be found in lean chicken, tuna, salmon, turkey, enriched flour, peanuts, and fortified cereals. It aids in digestion and also plays a key role in converting food into energy.

Vitamin B6 can be found in fortified cereals, fortified soy-based meat substitutes, baked potatoes with skin, bananas, light-meat chicken and turkey, eggs, and spinach. It’s vital for a healthy nervous system, and helps break down proteins and stored sugars.

Vitamin B12 is needed for creating red blood cells, and can be found in beef, clams, mussels, crabs, salmon, poultry, and soybeans.

Citrus fruits, red berries, tomatoes, potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, red and green bell peppers, cabbage, and spinach are all loaded with vitamin C, which is vital to promoting a healthy immune system, and making chemical messengers in the brain.

Vitamin D can be found in fortified milk, cheese, and cereals; egg yolks; salmon; but can also be made by the body from sunlight exposure. It’s needed to process calcium and maintain the health of bones and teeth.

Vitamin E functions as an antioxidant and is essential to your skin’s good health. Eat plenty of leafy green vegetables, almonds, hazelnuts, and vegetable oils like sunflower, canola, and soybean to get this vital nutrient.

Folic acid can be found in fortified cereals and grain products; lima, lentil, and garbanzo beans; and dark leafy vegetables. It’s vital for cell development, prevents birth defects, promotes heart health, and helps red blood cells form. Pregnant women need to take special care to ensure they are getting enough of this for themselves and their developing baby.

Dairy products, broccoli, dark leafy greens like spinach and rhubarb, and fortified products, such as orange juice, soy milk, and tofu are all loaded with calcium. Like vitamin D, it’s very important in helping to build and maintain strong bones and teeth.

Organ meats, oysters, clams, crabs, cashews, sunflower seeds, wheat bran cereals, whole-grain products, and cocoa products are all high in copper, which aids in metabolism of iron and red cell formation. It also assists in the production of energy for cells.

 Iron can be found in leafy green vegetables, beans, shellfish, red meat, poultry, soy foods, and some fortified foods.  It’s needed to transport oxygen to all parts of the body via the red blood cells.

Potassium can be found in foods like Broccoli, potatoes (with the skins on), prune juice, orange juice, leafy green vegetables, bananas, raisins, and tomatoes. It aids in nervous system and muscle function and also helps maintain a healthy balance of water in the blood and body tissues.

Red meat, fortified cereals, oysters, almonds, peanuts, chickpeas, soy foods, and dairy products are great dietary sources of zinc. Zinc supports the body’s immune function, reproduction capabilities, and the nervous systems.

Protein is the main component of muscles, organs, and glands. Every living cell and all body fluids, except bile and urine, contain protein. The cells of muscles, tendons, and ligaments are maintained with protein. Children and adolescents require protein for growth and development, and adults need it to maintain cell integrity. It can be found in foods like beans, milk and meat.

The primary function of carbohydrates is to provide energy for the body, especially the brain and the nervous system. Complex carbohydrates are the best choice for a stable blood sugar level. Whole grain breads and cereals, legumes, and starchy vegetables are all good complex carbohydrate sources.

Essential fatty acids play a part in many metabolic processes, and there is evidence to suggest that low levels of essential fatty acids, or the wrong balance of types among the essential fatty acids, may be a factor in a number of illnesses. Good sources are fish and shellfish, flaxseed, canola oil, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, leafy vegetables, and walnuts.

Though this list is far from complete, it gives a good base of knowledge on which to build a healthy, well-balanced diet.                                                                                                    Brussels sprout, Dairy product, Eating, Food, Health, Healthy diet, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, International Food Information Council, Leaf vegetable, Milk, Nutrition, Red blood cell, United States Department of Agriculture, USDA, Vitamin, Weight

Weight Loss Plan


Barry Gourmet moves his body

Barry Gourmet moves his body (Photo credit: Barry Gourmet and Raw)

Weight Loss Plan:                               The Goal to Go For :                                                                     What Is your Weight Loss Plan? To be successful when It comes to Weight Loss you must have a plan, and you have to stick to It. So It’s Important to take your time and think about how your Weight Loss Plan will affect your everyday life. Then you will be able to put together a plan that works for you.                                                                                                                                                                              Since excess weight puts you at risk for many health problems, you may need to set some weight loss plans to help avoid those risks and prevent disease.

But what should be your long-term goal? And what short-term goals should you set to help you get there? You have a better chance of attaining your goals if you make sure that the weight loss plans that you will use are sensible and reasonable right at the beginning.

Here are some guidelines from the experts in choosing weight loss plans and goals.

1. Be realistic

Most people’s long-term weight loss plans are more ambitious than they have to be.

For example, if you weigh 170 pounds and your long-term plan is to weigh 120, even if you have not weighed 120 since you were 16 and now you are 45, that is not a realistic weight loss goal.

Your body mass index or BMI is a good indicator of whether or not you need to shed of pounds. The ideal BMI range, according to the national Institutes of Health, is between 19 and 24.9. If your BMI is between 25 and 29.9, you are considered overweight. Any number above 30 is in the obesity range.

From this point of view, you will need a sensible weight loss plan that will correspond to the required BMI based on your height, because this is the primary factor that will affect your BMI.

2. Set appropriate objectives

Using a weight loss plan just for vanity’s sake is psychologically less helpful than losing weight to improve health.

You have made a big step forward if you decide to undergo a weight loss plan that includes exercise and eating right so that you will feel better and have more energy to do something positive in your life.

3. Focus on doing, not losing

Rather than saying that you are going to lose a pound this week, say how much you are going to exercise this week. This would definitely make up of a sensible weight loss plan.

Keep in mind that your weight within a span of a week is not completely in your control, but your behavior is.

4. Build bit by bit

Short-term weight loss plans should not be “pie-in-the-sky.” This means that when you have never exercised at all, your best weight loss plan for this week should be based on finding three different one-mile routes that you can walk the next week.

5. Keep up the self-encouragement

An all-or-nothing attitude only sets you up to fail. Learn to evaluate your efforts fairly and objectively. If you fall short of some goals, just look ahead to next week. You do not need to have a perfect record.

After all, self-encouragement should definitely be a part of your weight loss plans. Otherwise, you will just fail in the end.

6. Use measurable measures

Saying that you are going to be more positive this week or that you are going to really get serious this week is not a goal that you can measure and should not be a part of your weight loss plan.

This is another reason why you should incorporate exercise on your weight loss plan and focus on it. You should be able to count up the minutes of exercise in order to be successful in your plan.

The bottom line is, people should make-weight loss plans that will only remain as it is, just a plan. They have to put it into action by incorporating goals that will motivate them to succeed.                                                                                                                                                                     BMI, Body mass index, diet, Dieting, dieting programs, Eating, Fitness, Health, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, National Institutes of Health, Nutrition, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Shopping, Top Weight loss, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips

7 Simple Tricks to Prevent Overeating


7 Simple Tricks to Prevent Overeating                                                                                                                                                                        Well I found this on Shine from Yahoo, If you’re still struggling with Portion Control. These 7 simple Tricks can help If you stay consistent and make them a part of your life style.Over time you will start to eat less, stay active and watch those unwanted pounds disappear.                                                                                                                                                                                             A couple of extra bites at dinner. A second cookie nibbled with your afternoon tea.     In the grand scheme of overeating, these tidbits don’t seem like much.
But consider this: “If you consume 100 calories more than you burn every day, you’ll gain 10 pounds by the end of a year,” says Gail Altschuler, M.D., medical director of the Altschuler Clinic, a center for weight loss and wellness in Novato, California.
Sounds demoralizing. But now take that fact and turn it around: 100 calories isn’t a lot of food, after all — and you can use that to your advantage. “You don’t have to make enormous changes to see benefits and get results,” says Altschuler.
With that point in mind, we combed the research to find surprisingly simple ways to eat a little less. “Stack a few of these tips together,” Altschuler says, “and you could really see an impact.”
                                                                                                                                                                  1. Take a Seat Whenever you eat, sit at a table and use cutlery and a plate, rather than eat on the run, standing up, or at your desk. That way, the next time you eat you’ll chow about 30 percent less, according to a recent study.
The study’s author, Patricia Pliner, Ph.D., psychology researcher and professor at the University of Toronto at Mississauga, thinks this occurs because of the way we’ve been trained to perceive and respond to mealtime. Treating food like a meal, even if it’s a snack, tells your brain that you don’t need to eat for a while.
Hana Feeney, R.D., nutritionist at Canyon Ranch in Tucson, Arizona, adds that “if you make a rule not to eat without sitting and using a plate, you’ll eliminate a lot of the mindless calories consumed by picking.”
Plus: The Rules of Snacking                                                                                                                                                                         2. Sip Some Soup Before digging into your entrée, savor a bowl of soup. You’ll likely consume 20 percent fewer calories over the course of the meal (a good tip to remember if you tend to overeat at restaurants).The soup fills and stretches your stomach, “sending signals to your brain that tell you to stop or slow down eating,” Feeney says. To maximize nutrition and minimize calories, choose a vegetable or broth-based soup, such as gazpacho, and skip the cream-based selections.
                                                                                                                                                                    3. Think Simple Variety may be the spice of life, but it can ruin the best intentions when it comes to eating. We consume more calories when we see an array of food, say researchers. To understand how this works, scientists gave subjects m&ms and found that the more colors they mixed in a bowl, the more people ate.
Keep this tip in mind when planning a meal and don’t go overboard with the offerings — if you’re serving rice, for instance, pass on the bread and potatoes. As for buffets, why torture yourself? Steer clear.
Plus: Recipes to Jump-Start Weight Loss
                                                                                                                                                                      4. Downsize Bigger is not always better. Oversize dishes and spoons cause you to overeat — even if you think you’re a good judge of portions. Case in point: Nutrition experts who were given big bowls at an ice cream party devoured 31 percent more than those with smaller bowls.
Ditto on the serving spoons: Those helping themselves with bigger utensils downed 14.5 percent more ice cream than folks with smaller serving spoons (irrespective of bowl size).
“When there’s empty space on the plate, a panic sets in that you’re not going to have enough to eat,” Feeney says — thus the tendency to load up your dish. Cut calories by using salad plates or Grandma’s china (antique plates are typically smaller). And downsize those serving utensils, too.
                                                                                                                                                                  5. Hide It It’s true: When we see food, we eat it. A study of secretaries found that those with chocolate candies in clear containers on their desks ate almost twice as much as they did than when the candies were “hidden” in opaque containers. They also ate less if the candy was placed at least six feet away from their desks. The moral? Don’t mess with temptation. Keep calorie-dense treats covered, tucked away in a cabinet, or out of reach.
When you really want a snack of, say, a cookie, go for broke rather than opt for the low-fat version of the treat. In one study, people who ate snack foods that boasted a reduced fat content consumed as much as 50 percent more calories than when they ate regular versions of the same foods.It appears that those labels function like permission slips, giving us the okay to eat our fill. “Foods low in calories or fat, or low in sugar or carbs, tend to reduce our inhibition,” Feeney says.
                                                                                                                                                                   6. Sniff a Whiff Apparently, peppermint’s powers go beyond freshening your breath. A small study at Wheeling Jesuit University in West Virginia found that people who inhaled peppermint essential oil every two hours ate 23 percent fewer calories during a five-day period.When you’re struck with the urge to visit the vending machine, put this finding to work for you by keeping a small vial of the oil handy; you can also try popping a mint or sipping a strong cup of peppermint tea.
                                                                                                                                                                   7. Be Sneaky Sometimes, perception means more than reality. You can trick yourself into thinking you have more food by serving choices that spread out — like roasted, cubed potatoes or pasta shells with sauce — instead of dense foods, like mashed potatoes or lasagna.
The spread-out dishes look like more but cost less, calorie-wise. Craving chocolate with your fruit? Skip the bar and shave a small piece onto a bowlful. It looks like a bigger portion, so you’re more likely to feel satisfied.                                                                                                                                              Calorie, Canyon Ranch, diet, Dieting, Eating, Fitness, Food, Healthy Ways to Lose Weight, Human nutrition, Loss Weight, Nutrition, Overeating, Physical exercise, Portion Control, Portion control (dieting), Serving size, Snack, Soup, Top Weight loss, Weight, weight loss, Weight Loss Tips, weight tips